Monthly Archives: July 2014

Sneak Peek—My August Paste Paper Show

During the month of August, I will be the Featured Artist at the Ashland Art Center. My show will focus on different kinds of art that I have created with paste paper. These are all new pieces that I’ve worked on over the past 5 months. Here is your sneak peek at what I will be showing.

If you've been following my blog, you've seen my Earth Spirit Vessels. Many of the pieces of paper in this one are my hand painted paste papers which are painted and ironed before being folded.

If you’ve been following my blog, you’ve probably seen my Earth Spirit Vessels. Many of the parts of this one are pieces of my hand painted paste papers, which are painted and ironed flat before being folded. The vessel is titled, Tumbleweeds.

This is one of a series of calligraphy pieces with a paste paper background. I scanned all the images and combined them in Photoshop and had it printed on metal.

This is one of a series of eight calligraphy pieces with a paste paper background. I scanned all the images separately, worked with the scans in several graphics programs, and had the finished digital pieces printed on aluminum.

The show will run for the month of August. During the First Friday Art Walk on August 1, there will be a paste paper making clomid demonstration in my studio, Studio 12. If you are in Ashland on Friday, August 1, be sure to stop by.

For more information about Paste Paper, you might enjoy these past blog posts:

Making Paste Papers: Part One

Making Paste Papers: Part Two

Children Making Paste Paper

Enjoy, Candy

The Wish Project, by Helen Hiebert

I took an illuminated paper sculptures class from Helen Hiebert in her Portland, Oregon studio a couple of years ago, before she moved to Colorado. It was a wonderful experience, and I’ve been following her progress ever since. She’s an amazing artist.

Helen Hiebert standing under a giant dandelion like sculpture called The Wish

Helen Hiebert standing under a giant dandelion sculpture called The Wish

Helen claims to be an introvert, but her installation work often engages large communities. She loves connecting with people from all walks of life, and says that she learns much from their diverse points of view. She collects data that she disseminates through her artwork. Often, it is invisible. Her projects begin with common themes—like making a wish. Everyone has hopes, dreams, prayers, aspirations…

Helen collected more than 200 wishes from around the world for THE WISH project, her most recent installation, which is, at the time of this blog post, at Anythink Huron Street. I sent her a wish of my own as part of the project, and it was included in the sculpture. With each wish, she received a little something from the giver—a glimpse into their view of the world. As you walk into the room and see THE WISH—a giant dandelion sculpture suspended from the ceiling—and hear the wishes of people from the community of the motion-activated sound track, her wish is that you will take the time to listen and to hear what others are saying. And then she hopes that you will make your own wish too.

(Anythink Huron Street is a 25,000-square-foot library located at the intersection of Conifer and Huron streets in Thornton, Colorado. I really want to get there to see Helen’s latest paper sculpture.)

Enjoy, Candy

I Learn More From Failure Than From Success

I’ve been receiving a whole lot of positive comments and pats on the back recently. And, while it really feels good, I feel like I need to remind everyone that not everything works out.

It took me 2 weeks of trying and failing before I got a this lotus flower that I really liked.

It took me 2 weeks of trying and failing before I got a successful lotus flower.

I have had to overcome a lot of failures in order to get to the successes.

I feel it’s important to embrace your failures and learn from them. It’s through failure that I learn the most. Not from failure itself, but from the experience of creating and experimenting and learning why it didn’t work and what parts of it did work. My successes don’t help me nearly as much as my failures do. And sometimes those failures end up turning into a success somewhere down the line.

My first attempts at calligraphy were dismal. I practiced for years before I felt I was any good at all.

My first attempts at calligraphy were dismal. I practiced for years before I felt I was any good at all.

For those of you trying to make art for the first time, please don’t stop trying just because the first thing you try doesn’t turn out looking like a professional piece of art.

When I started playing around with making my paper lotus flowers, it took me two whole weeks to get to where I made one that I felt was good enough to show to anyone. Persistence can sometimes trump natural ability.

I love the way my Lotus Flowers come out now. But I did have to learn that not all papers will work well to make Lotus Flowers.

I love the way my Lotus Flowers come out now. But I did have to learn that not all papers will work well to make Lotus Flowers. I always found a new use for the papers that didn’t work well for Lotus Flowers.

I thought this paper would be my answer to making paste paper to use for my vessels. Once in water, however, the paper disintegrated. I had to start over looking for the right paper.

I thought this paper would be my answer to making paste paper to use for my vessels. Once in water, however, the this paper disintegrated. 

So here is my failure for the day. I wanted to use this Japanese sumi paper to make paste paper out of. Well, as soon as I wet it, it started disintegrating. I had my heart set on using this paper for a specific project for my Paste Paper Show. Obviously that’s not going to happen. Back to square one.

I have no idea what project I can use that I will want disintegrating paper for, but if I ever do, this is the paper I will try first.

I finally found a paper that I could make paste papers with that didn't fall apart when wet and didn't crack when folded. It took nearly a year of trial and error to find just the right paper.

I finally found a paper that I could make paste papers with that didn’t fall apart when wet and didn’t crack when folded. It took nearly a year of trial and error to find just the right paper. Here is my latest Earth Spirit Vessel in progress.

These Fortune Cookies are made from Tyvek that I thought would work well for book covers. Well, the Tyvek could be used, but it was hard to glue without getting bubbles. However, it works great for making Fortune Cookies.

These Fortune Cookies are made from Tyvek that I thought would work well for book covers. Well, the Tyvek could be used for book covers, but it was hard to glue without getting bubbles. I found Tyvek works great for making Fortune Cookies.

In closing, keep the positive comments coming, just don’t get discouraged about things not coming together the first time you try them.

Keep creating, Candy