Monthly Archives: June 2015

Studio Snapshot – Pencils To Match Gift Tins

Last week after sharing my Paper Covered Metal Tea Tins, I decided that each tin ought to have its own set of matching paper wrapped pencils. So that’s what I made in my studio this past week.

I think these gift wrapped tea tins just became pencil holders.

I think these gift wrapped tea tins just became pencil holders.

Metal tea tin to unique pencil holder.

Metal tea tin to unique pencil holder.

Metal tea tin to unique pencil holder.

Metal tea tin to unique pencil holder.

Metal tea tin to unique pencil holder.

Metal tea tin to unique pencil holder.

Metal tea tin to unique pencil holder.

Metal tea tin to unique pencil holder.

Metal tea tin to unique pencil holder.

Metal tea tin to unique pencil holder.

I just love how they turned out!

Here are links to the tea tins and how I made them, how I wrapped the pencils and how I make paste papers.

link to: What To Do With Empty Metal Tea Tins

link to: DIY – Decorative Gift Containers

link to: DIY Paper Wrapped Pencils

link to: Making Paste Papers: Part One

Enjoy, Candy

 

DIY – Pinwheel Fold Card

I saw a card that I liked the look of on the internet last week. There were no instructions on how to make it, so I made my own and the instructions to go with it. When I was done, I decided it looked like a pinwheel, so I named it the Pinwheel Fold Card.

One Pinwheel Fold Card open and one closed.

One Pinwheel Fold Card open and one closed.

Then I decided to google “pinwheel fold card” and found out that other people have made the card and called it the same name. I even found instructions on how to make them on YouTube. My instructions, however, are a bit different from those on YouTube. My instructions allow you to make this card using any size square. My instructions also doesn’t require straight and diagonal folding boards. Once you have made your first one, you realize that they’re really quite easy to make.

I made my Pinwheel Fold cards in two different sizes.

I made my Pinwheel Fold Cards in two different sizes.

The basic concept of this card is that there is an inside square and an outside square. The length of the side of the inside square is half the length of the outside square. If the outside square is 8″, then the inside square is 4″.

Here are the papers I am using to make a Pinwheel Fold Card.

Here are the papers I used to make my Pinwheel Fold Card.

I started with 2 text weight 8″ squares of paper,  a card stock 4″ square in gold and a 3.5″ square with the card message on it. You can see my choice of colors and patterns above. Using two coordinating patterns would work nicely too.

Here are the steps I went through to make my Pinwheel Fold Card.

Here are the steps I went through to make my Pinwheel Fold Card.

Instructions:

  1. Using either a glue stick or double sided tape, glue the two 8″ squares together in the center only. In order to let the papers bend without buckling, make sure the gluing is only in the center of the two squares and doesn’t extend out to where you will be folding (see figure 1 above).
  2. With a pencil, mark with a line the middle of the length and width of the square that will be the inside of the card (figure 2).
  3. Lay the 4″ card stock with the points of the square lining up with the pencil marks that show the middle of the larger square. Glue in place (figure 3).
  4. Fold up the outside paper against the inside square (figure 4).
  5. Repeat around each side of the square. Notice that there are 4 triangles made at the intersection of these folds (figure 5).
  6. Cut out the triangles (figure 6).
  7. Turn the card over. Fold the first pinwheel flap as shown in figure 7.
  8. Repeat for all 4 sides (figure 8).
  9. Turn the card over again and glue the message into the middle of the card (figure 9).
  10. Start folding the sides of the card up, one overlapping the next. Make sure you fold so that the result looks like a pinwheel (figure 10).
  11. When you get to the last flap, insert it under the first, like folding a box lid (figure 11).
  12. The finished Pinwheel Fold Card (figure 12).

In addition to working with the 8″ squares, I also used some 6″ origami squares of both printed and coordinating solid papers. Using the origami paper, which was already cut, made the cards go super fast. With the 6″ squares, I used a piece of 3″ card stock for the inside square.

These Pinwheel Fold Cards were made from 2 sheets each of coordinating origami paper, one print and one solid.

These Pinwheel Fold Cards were made from 2 sheets each of coordinating origami paper, one print and one solid.

Note: The pinwheel folds keeps the two papers together, so no additional gluing is necessary after the first gluing in step one.

I hope you enjoy making your own Pinwheel Fold Cards.

Happy Summer, Candy

Studio Snapshot – What To Do With Empty Metal Tea Tins

One of my favorite teas is Double Green Matcha tea. It comes 50 bags to a tin. But what to do with the tins once the tea is gone? I’ve been drinking this tea for years, so I’ve built up quite a stash of tins. The empty tins are too good to just throw in the recycle bin.

All these started out holding tea bags, like the tea tin in the middle of the photo.

These all started out holding tea bags, like the tea tin in the middle of the photo.

First, I clean the tea tins. The paper comes off  easily, but the adhesive is a little harder to get off. I found De-Solv-it works fairly well. It sometimes takes a few applications, but I usually have a clean and sparkling tin in minutes.

Empty metal tea tins are easy to decorate for use as gift containers.

Empty metal tea tins are easy to decorate for use as gift containers.

For these tins, I printed some of my paste papers onto a light weight Japanese sketch paper. The paper muted the colors of the paste paper a bit, but I loved the look and the texture. I found that a light weight paper, and light weight oriental papers specifically, work wonderfully for this project.

Empty metal tea tins are easy to decorate for use as gift containers.

Empty metal tea tins are easy to decorate for use as gift containers.

I wrote a DIY blog post on how I wrap these tins a number of years ago (see link at bottom of this article). This technique will work for lots of different containers you may have in your kitchen. I’ve wrapped cocoa tins, spice jars, even oatmeal containers.

Empty metal tea tins are easy to decorate for use as gift containers.

Empty metal tea tins are easy to decorate for use as gift containers.

This is an easy project. It’s a perfect summer project to do with children. All you need is a container, a light weight paper and some double stick tape. It would work great to use children’s artwork as the paper wrapping too.

link to DIY – Decorative Gift Containers

Happy Creating, Candy

Paper Father’s Day Gift Ideas

My father says he doesn’t want anything for Father’s Day. He claims he has everything he wants and is more interested in getting rid of things than accumulating more stuff. I figure I can get away giving him Father’s Day gifts as long as they are consumables. Here’s what I have in mind for this year. Links to  projects are included at the end of this post.

Happy Father's Day accordion card book.

Happy Father’s Day accordion card book.

First, I know he loves crossword puzzles. I gave him a set of pencils wrapped in paper from the New York Times crossword puzzle paper a year and a half ago. They were a big hit and I’m pretty sure he could use some new ones.

These pencils were wrapped in a New York Times crossword puzzle from my local Sunday newspaper. They are going to my father, an avid crossword puzzle fan.

These pencils are wrapped in a New York Times crossword puzzle from my local Sunday newspaper. 

Next up is chocolate. I know he likes chocolate and he also likes spicy. What could be more perfect than Xocolatl Taster Squares from Dagoba Chocolate. They contain rich dark chocolate, chilies & nibs. I’m sure he’ll love them.

Xocolatl Dagoba Chocolate Taster Squares (with chillies) are the perfect size to fit into my Clover Fold Boxes.

Xocolatl Dagoba Chocolate Taster Squares (with chillies) are the perfect size to fit into my Clover Fold Boxes.

Then there’s the packaging. I designed these Clover Leaf Boxes to fit one Dagoba Taster Square for this past March For April’s Oregon Chocolate Festival.

I know I can't go wrong giving my dad milk chocolate Taster Squares. Shown with my Clover Fold Boxes that I made to hold a single Dagoba Chocolate Taster Square.

I know I can’t go wrong giving my dad milk chocolate Taster Squares, shown here with my Clover Fold Boxes that I made to hold a single Dagoba Chocolate Taster Square.

Dagoba Chocolate just introduced two new Taster Squares, orange and lemonberry zest. OMG! I tasted both and they are ever so delicious. It was hard to choose my favorite, but the orange finally won.

Dagoba Taster Squares and Clover Fold Boxes. My new favorite, orange is on the left. Lemonberry zest is on the right.

Dagoba Taster Squares and Clover Fold Boxes. My new favorite, orange is on the left. Lemonberry zest is on the right.

I have found that the presentation of a gift can make the gift feel super special. So, my Father’s Day card is going in one of my Father’s Day gift bags. The gift bag makes a great statement.

Father's Day Tie Gift Bag - This paper reminds me of art deco. I even made a paper lotus flower from this paper.

Father’s Day Tie Gift Bag is made from a 9″ by 12″ white envelope and a decorative paper for the tie which is attached with velcro.

I also made a larger clover fold box that holds 5 Dagoba Chocolate Taster Squares. I was thinking of a masculine color, so I made it black. Then I got the idea of making a topper for it, so I made the Happy Father’s Day “ribbon” and attached it to the top of the box.

A larger version of my Clover Fold Box with a little topper for Father's Day.

A larger version of my Clover Fold Box with a little topper for Father’s Day.

Since my dad doesn’t go on the internet, I feel certain that he won’t see what I’m giving him for Father’s Day. If you know him, please don’t spill the beans.

Have a Happy Father’s Day!

link to DIY Paper Wrapped Pencils

link to Clover Fold Box instructions

link to Father’s Day Gift Tie Bags

link to more Accordion Card Books

Enjoy Candy

Studio Snapshot – Red, White and Blue Star Garland

I’m still playing with red, white and blue paper along with the 4th of July theme. I’ve made a Red, White & Blue Wreath as well as Red, White & Blue Paper Balls and now it’s a Red, White & Blue Star Garland.

Two red, white and blue star garlands draped over one of my chairs.

Two red, white and blue star garlands draped over one of my chairs.

I’ve been out of town for most of the past two weeks. But when I got back, I noticed the red, white and blue papers from my folded paper balls project and decided I needed to do something with stars. I cut the stars out of the colored papers and hand sewed them, similar to what I did when I made my Folded Paper Heart Garland.

I started my garland with stars  that I folded in half and sewed two stars together with blue embroidery thread. Then I opened the stars (like a little book) to create a dimensional effect.

I started my garland with stars that I folded in half and sewed two stars together with blue embroidery thread. Then I opened the stars (like a little book) to create a dimensional effect.

This was a quick, fun project. I made 2 star garlands and am now working on my third. I got my beads that I put at the bottom of my garlands from my favorite bead store, Dancing Beads in Medford, OR. Carol Garfield, the owner, has the most fabulous bead selection. Dancing Beads has classes too (for those of you who live in Southern Oregon).

Red, white and blue star garland.

Red, white and blue star garland.

Red, white and blue star garland.

Red, white and blue star garland.

Red, white and blue star garland and some of my paper balls I gave instructions for on my last blog post.

Red, white and blue star garland and some of my paper balls I gave instructions for on my last blog post.

Enjoy, Candy

DIY Red, White and Blue Paper Balls

It’s the season for red, white and blue, and since I still had red, white and blue paper sitting around after making my Red, White & Blue Patriotic Wreath, I decided to make red, white and blue paper balls.

Here I have put 5 paper balls in a glass vase. Loving the look!

Here I put 5 paper balls in a glass vase. Loving the look!

My first experience making paper balls happened by accident last year when I was trying a slightly different technique to make a paper flower. The flower backfired, but I loved the fact that I could make a ball. I decided to see if I could replicate my accident, this time on purpose, using my red, white and blue paper.

Here I have put the balls in glass dessert dishes.

Here I put the balls in glass dessert dishes.

I used 60# and 70# text weight papers. These were a bit heavier than the recycled book paper I used with my “accident” and required just a bit more manipulation. When I used the recycled book paper, the paper just exploded into a ball. This time I had to carefully pull apart the folds, but the result was the same, a lovely paper ball.

The larger paper balls are made from 3″ squares and the smaller ones are made from 2.5″ squares. Any size square will work. I used 15 squares for each of my balls.

2015 DIY Red White and Blue Paper Balls 4 copy

Instructions:

1. Start with about 15 pieces of square paper. Fold in half, then half again. Fold one flap up from center fold to make a triangle. Repeat with second flap. See photo #1 above.

Note: Make sure all folds are  on one side of the folded paper and all loose ends are on the other.

2. Make a template out of card stock and round the top of the folded triangle as in photo #2 above. You are cutting  and rounding the loose ends of the paper.

3. Glue one rounded triangle side of  a folded paper to a second folded paper (photo #3 above).

4. Continue until all 15 pieces have been glued together (photo #4 above).

5. Starting at one end, open up one of the triangles as in photo #5 above. Opened, it will form a flower-like circle.

6. Continue opening the next triangle, and the next, etc. (photo #6 above).

7. A little twisting is sometimes needed to make the ball shape. Photo #7 shows the completed folded paper ball.

The red and blue paper balls are made from 3" papers and the white ball from 2.5" paper.

The red and blue paper balls are made from 3″ square papers and the white ball from 2.5″ square papers.

Happy Creating, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Color, Shape & Henri Matisse Workshop With Dory Kanter

This past week I took a wonderful workshop, Color, Shape & Henri Matisse taught by Dory Kanter at the Sitka Center for Art and Ecology on the Oregon Coast. I have taken many wonderful workshops at Sitka, and this one was exceptional.

From our Nōtan project.

From our Nōtan project.

Dory first gave us a brief history of Matisse which included a power point slide show and a video. I learned quite a bit about Matisse that wasn’t taught in my Art History courses. It really helped to understand the progression of his art throughout his life.

Workshop participants working on the watercolor collage exercise.

Workshop participants working on the watercolor collage exercise.

Next we played with Nōtan (濃淡?), a Japanese design concept involving the play and placement of light and dark as they are placed next to the other. We started with a square of black square and a larger red, yellow or blue paper.

A closer look at some of our Nōtan works.

A closer look at some of our Nōtan works.

Another of our projects was a watercolor collage. Working with a sense of place, we made and then cut up a watercolor wash to make our collage. It was amazing to see how everyone interpreted the assignment differently.

Some of our watercolor collages.

Some of our watercolor collages.

We had warm up exercises, then made brush drawings that were based on some of Matisse’s brush paintings. We each put our own twist on our paintings.

At the end of the workshop, we laid out our favorite pieces on our tables and walked around enjoying all the are we produced. It was an amazing experience.

At the end of the workshop, we laid out our favorite pieces on our tables and walked around enjoying all the art we produced. It was an amazing experience.

I hadn’t realized that all of Matisse’s cut outs were made from paper that had been painted. He used a high quality gouache that is still produced today.

More samples of the art we made at the workshop.

More samples of the art we made during the workshop.

We painted our own gouache papers and cut the papers and made another collage. With each exercise, we took another look at the work of Matisse for inspiration, though we always incorporated our own personalities into our art.

More samples of the art we made at the workshop.

More samples of the art we made during the workshop.

There were 17 workshop participants, ranging from beginners to professional artists. Dory is an incredible teacher and made the workshop fun and educational for all of us. I learned a lot and loved the experience.

More samples of the art we made at the workshop.

More samples of the art we made during the workshop.

One of the exercises Dory had us do came from her book, Art Escapes, which I own. It’s a wonderful book with daily exercises and inspirations for discovering greater creativity and artistic confidence. One of these days I will do a review of her book. It’s a great resource.

More samples of the art we made at the workshop.

More samples of the art we made during the workshop.

The end of the workshop came all too soon. I would have liked to stay for another couple of days to try out more of the ideas and inspiration that Dory shared with us.

Nōtan examples. Mine is on the left, Paul's is on the right.

Nōtan examples. Mine is on the left, Paul’s is on the right.

I hope to keep in touch with my fellow workshop attendees and see how they incorporate what we learned in this workshop into their art. I know I will be trying new things with my art as a result of this workshop. Thank you, Dory.

These are two of my pieces of the same scene out my living room window.

These are two of my pieces of the same scene out my living room window.

The above two photos were from two different exercises that used the same subject matter. It’s amazing how different they turned out.

Photos from 4 journals from workshop participants. Mine is the bottom right. I have an idea for Nōtan-like alphabet. Look for it in a future blog post if I like the way it comes out.

Photos from 4 journals from workshop participants. Mine is the bottom right. I have an idea for Nōtan-inspired alphabet. Look for it in a future blog post (if I like the way it comes out).

If you ever get the chance, I highly recommend taking a workshop at the Sitka Center for Art and Ecology. I also recommend any workshops taught by Dory Kanter.

Enjoy, Candy

DIY – Red, White & Blue Patriotic Wreath

I got the idea for this red, white and blue folded paper wreath in the wee hours of the morning, just as I was waking up. It went together just as I imagined it would.

Paper wreath made for the 4th of July.

Paper wreath made for the 4th of July.

I remember making lanyards as a kid, and thought the technique would work well for paper folding. I simplified it to just use 2 paper strips, folding over each other again and again, gluing on another strip of paper when needed.

Here's how I made my folded paper strips that I wound around a cardboard ring to make my red, white & blue wreath.

Here’s how I made my folded paper strips that I wound around a cardboard ring to make my red, white & blue wreath.

Directions For Folded Paper Strips:
  1. Cut strips red, white and blue paper 1.5″ in width
  2. Place a red and a white piece of paper together at right angles to each other (see first photo above)
  3. Fold the white paper over the red paper (see second photo above)
  4. Continue alternatively folding the red over the white, then the white over the red
  5. You will get an accordion like looking folded chain (see third photo above)
  6. Glue a new strip of the same color paper when necessary (see fourth photo above)
  7. Continue until you have a folded paper chain about as long as you are tall
  8. Make a second folded paper chain the same way using just blue paper

For the base of the wreath I glued 2 pieces of cardboard together and cut a circle about 1/2″ wide (as in photo below). Then I painted it white because I was pretty sure some of it would show through after I wrapped my folded paper around it. I think a wreath base made from a wire coat hanger or a foam wreath would work just fine too.

This photo shows the cardboard base I made for my wreath after I painted it white along with the folded paper accordion chains I wrapped around the cardboard.

This photo shows the cardboard base I made for my wreath, painted white, along with the folded paper accordion chains I wrapped around the cardboard.

I figured the best way to attach the paper as I wrapped it around my cardboard base, was to use a glue gun. I really avoid glue guns unless absolutely necessary. I am not adept with glue guns and usually end up with more glue on my fingers than on my project. This time was no exception. But the glue gun did the job where regular glue would not have worked.

I wrapped the two folded paper chains around the cardboard and glued as I wrapped.

I wrapped the two folded paper chains around the cardboard and glued (with the glue gun) as I wrapped.

I kept wrapping and gluing. I put a gob of hot glue on the cardboard and wrapped the paper around it and kept going.

I continued wrapping and gluing.

I continued wrapping and gluing.

While I made a mess of the glue on my hands and on the table, once the glue was dry, it just pealed right off. Clean up was so easy.

When I got to the end, I liked the effect of just letting the ends of the paper hang down, so I simply cut them the same length and let them hang.

When I got to the end, I liked the effect of just letting the ends of the paper hang down, so I simply cut them the same length and let them hang.

The folding took a little bit of time, but the wrapping went quite quickly thanks to the glue gun.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Eco-Holders

I made my first Eco-Holder a few years ago after going to an Estate Sale where the sellers were going to take a garage full of paperback books to the landfill. I took three large garbage bags full of these books and tried to think of something to do with them that would keep them out of the landfill. Eco-Holders were the result.

Three Eco-Holders made from recycled books, tiles and beads.

Three Eco-Holders made from recycled books, tiles and beads.

I used all recycled components to make my Eco-Holders. The books were saved from going to the landfill. The tiles and beads are from Habitat for Humanity ReStore, from the discard bin at a local tile shop or from Scrap in Portland.

I originally made Eco-Holders to hold business cards, but people have used them to hold many different things.

I originally made Eco-Holders to hold business cards, but people have used them to hold many different things.

After folding and making what I thought was something to hold business cards, I started selling my Eco-Holders in my studio at the Ashland Art Center.

Another Eco-Holder that I made this past week.

Another Eco-Holder that I made this past week.

My customers have found many other uses for my Eco-Holders. They have been used to hold poetry, recipes, “to-do” notes, grocery lists, Christmas cards (for a display), business cards and more.

This Eco-Holder reminds me of a hedgehog.

This Eco-Holder reminds me of a hedgehog.

Making Eco-Holders is what I’ve been doing in my studio this past week. I really enjoy making something useful out of recycled items.

This Eco-Holder sits on a peg and can be turned upside down for a slightly different look.

This Eco-Holder sits on a peg and can be turned upside down for a slightly different look.

Enjoy, Candy