Category Archives: Cards

DIY Torn Paper Santa Holiday Cards

My Christmas cards this year are a graphic image of Santa made from cut and torn pieces of red, white and tan paper. These are easy to make and would be a fun project to do with children.

My torn paper Santa Christmas cards are waiting to be mailed.

My torn paper Santa Christmas cards are waiting to be mailed.

Materials: I used red paper, beige paper and white paper. For the torn white paper, I tried both a printmaking paper  (unknown brand from my stash) and 80# Strathmore Aquarius watercolor paper. Both worked well, but I really liked how the soft printmaking paper tore. For my adhesive I used double sided tape, but glue stick would work well. You want an adhesive that isn’t very wet because that would wrinkle the paper. I also used a black marker, a light brown marker and blush makeup. In lieu of blush makeup, a crayon or pastel or chalk would work, possibly a marker.

My torn paper Santa cards look more difficult to make than they are.

My torn paper Santa cards look more difficult to make than they are.

Instructions for 5″ by 7″ card:

  1. I used red paper, beige paper and white printmaking paper (light weight watercolor paper would work well too). Text weights are fine for the red and beige papers.
  2. Cut red paper 5″ wide and about 2.5″ high and paste it on the top of the card (I used double stick tape, but glue stick would work as well).
  3. Cut beige paper 5″ wide and about 2.5″ high and paste under the red paper.
  4. Tear a white paper and paste it between the red and beige paper.
  5. For the beard, tear a piece of white paper that is 5″ wide and play around with making it look like a beard. When you are happy with the way it looks, trim the bottom of the paper to where the bottom of the card will be and glue to the card.
  6. Decorate your Santa. Black pen for eyes and mouth. Colored pen for nose. Makeup blush for the cheeks, or use a crayon or marker.
My torn paper Santa Christmas Card.

My torn paper Santa Christmas Card.

Next step is to write messages and address the envelopes.

Enjoy, Candy

Ladybug Cards & Mobile

In just two weeks, I will be opening my home studio to the public during the Ashland Gallery Association Open Studio Tour. It’ll be the first time I’ve opened my home studio for viewing and it’s a little scary for me. I decided to include a number of demonstrations of my more popular blog projects. That includes my ladybug cards and ladybug mobile.

Ladybug cards.

Ladybug cards.

I designed my ladybug cards last summer. They can easily be glued to a card or glued back to back on a string to make a mobile. I’m sure there are many more ways these wonderful ladybugs can be used.

Ladybug card and ladybug mobile in progress.

Ladybug card with ladybug mobile in progress.

The ladybugs themselves are made from a square of red paper. When added to the card, they make a wonderful 3-D effect. And when glued to the string of the mobile, they move wonderfully when there is any breeze or other movement around them.

Ladybug card with ladybug mobile in progress.

Ladybug card with ladybug mobile in progress.

Instructions for making these ladybugs are on my blog post: DIY Ladybug Card. You can also see more photos of my ladybug garland on my blog post: Paper Ladybug Garlands.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – More Playing With Paper Cutting

I haven’t spent much time in my studio this past week as I was camping in the high desert of Oregon. It was a wonderful time for me to relax and commune with nature. It was very restorative and I now have a lot more art energy pent up. I’m ready to start working on my art with a new vigor.

After cutting these flowers, I put paste papers behind the cut out portions to give them each unique colors and patterns.

After cutting these flowers, I put paste papers behind the cut out portions to give them each unique colors and patterns.

What time I did spend in my studio was playing around with the paper cutting I started last month. I made a few more flower designs and played with putting some of my paste papers behind them the cut out areas.

A single hand cut flower backed with painted paste paper.

A single hand cut flower backed with painted paste paper.

I like the look of these and will continue to explore imitrex paper cutting. I am sure this is just the beginning of a new addition to my paper addiction.

Hand cut flowers backed with painted paste paper.

Hand cut flowers backed with painted paste paper.

For details about how I cut my cards, check out my blog post: DIY – Playing With Paper Cutting.

A single hand cut flower backed with painted paste paper.

A single hand cut flower backed with painted paste paper.

I photographed my cards on one of my paste papers. To learn more about my paste papers, check out my blog post: Making Paste Papers: Part One.

Hand cut flowers backed with painted paste paper.

Hand cut flowers backed with painted paste paper.

Enjoy, Candy

Learning Experiences (a.k.a. mistakes)

My personal motto is: “If you can’t learn from your mistakes, there’s no sense making them.” Well this past week was apparently set aside for learning from my mistakes as I had a few problems with my custom order for 16 accordion card books.

Cracking when folding. From now on, I will be very careful of mixing acrylic inks in my watercolors when I know I'll be folding the paper.

Cracking when folding. From now on, I will be very careful of mixing acrylic inks in my watercolors when I know I’ll be folding the paper.

I thought I had everything under control. I wrote out a schedule to make sure I was going to get the order completed in a week. Everything was going fine until Saturday when I folded the 12 Thank You’s just prior to attaching their covers. That’s when the color cracked on most of the folds.

Another example of cracking on the fold.

Another example of cracking on the fold.

What happened? I was recreating a color combination that I had done about a year ago. The colors looked fine, so I didn’t run a check of one completed book. I just did them all together. Apparently I mixed too much FW Pearlescent Liquid Acrylic into my watercolors. Oops!

Another learning experience – don't rush! Here I rushed and got just a drop of glue on my paper. I didn't notice it and put it under weights. The paper tore when I opened the book. Another oops!

Another learning experience – don’t rush! Here I rushed and got just a drop of glue on my paper. I didn’t notice it and put it under weights. The paper tore when I opened the book.

And to add insult to injury, as I rushing to replace the card books that had cracked, I made another mistake. This time I wasn’t careful with my glue because I was trying to get as many accordion card books finished as possible so I could get them to the Post Office before closing time. Note to self: You will probably get more done if you don’t rush. Just breathe and do what you can.

One of the card books open, the rest closed. The two in front are finished and have their gold ties with beads.

One of the card books open, the rest closed. The two in front are finished and have their gold ties with beads.

The good news is that I have a wonderful client who didn’t mind that I only sent out part of her order today. I’ll send the rest out later this week.

These are the accordion card books that went out today. I have placed a protective paper in them so any moisture from the glue won't warp the opposite page.

These are the accordion card books that went out today. I have placed a paper as a barrier for any moisture left over from recent gluing.

Lessons learned. Run a check before making multiples of anything. Don’t rush. And maybe, add a little more time on projects for the unexpected. Hopefully this will help you from making these same mistakes.

Happy creating, Candy

DIY – Playing With Paper Cutting

While I was at my week long Calligraphy and Art Retreat a couple of weeks ago, I tried my hand at paper cutting. This was my first time drawing and then cutting my design in paper, sort of like cutting a stencil. Now that I’m home, I decided to try using the technique to make a greeting card.

My first attempt at paper cutting.

My first attempt at paper cutting.

I made a pretty easy and basic design. I have seen some amazing hand cut papers  and this is not one of them. This is me, a beginner at paper cutting, showing you what I did. I started with a piece of Strathmore Aquarius watercolor paper. I cut a strip 5″ by 11″ and folded it into thirds. On the center third I used a pencil to draw my design. This is the back of the paper and I cut from the back also.

I drew my design (rather loosely) on the middle third of my paper.

I drew my design (rather loosely) on the middle third of my paper.

Once the design was drawn, I cut it out, more freeform than following the lines exactly. I used a craft knife with an x-acto #11 blade. I think I’m going to get a 100 blade pack. This paper cutting is a lot of fun.

Completed card and one showing how I didn't always follow my pencil drawing lines. I made slight alterations as I cut.

Completed card and one showing how I didn’t always follow my pencil drawing lines. I made slight alterations as I cut.

After I cut out my design. I glued a colored paper behind the cut out. I used glue stick. Then I used double sided tape to cover the back side of the colored paper. I will try some different designs soon.

If you want to see some incredible paper cuts, check out these links. And don’t expect me to be making anything like these anytime soon. I’ll stay with simpler paper cutting. Still, this is wonderful eye candy.
Mr. Riu
Karen Bit Vejle
Emma Boyes

Enjoy, Candy

 

DIY – Pinwheel Fold Card

My most popular DIY from last year has been my Pinwheel Fold Card. I decided to repeat it. I originally found a photo on the internet of this card, but no instructions, so I created my own version. The card looked like a pinwheel, so I called it a Pinwheel Fold Card.

One Pinwheel Fold Card open and one closed.

One Pinwheel Fold Card open and one closed.

After I made the card, I decided to google “pinwheel fold card” and found out that other people have made the card and called it the same name. I even found instructions on how to make them on YouTube. My instructions, however, are a bit different from those on YouTube. My instructions allow you to make this card using any size square. My instructions also doesn’t require straight and diagonal folding boards. Once you have made your first one, you realize that they’re really quite deceasy to make.

I made my Pinwheel Fold cards in two different sizes.

I made my Pinwheel Fold Cards in two different sizes.

The basic concept of this card is that there is an inside square and an outside square. The length of the side of the inside square is half the length of the outside square. If the outside square is 8 inches, then the inside square is 4 inches.

Here are the papers I am using to make a Pinwheel Fold Card.

Here are the papers I used to make my Pinwheel Fold Card.

I started with 2 text weight 8 inch squares of paper,  a card stock 4 inch square in gold and a 3.5 inch square with the card message on it. You can see my choice of colors and patterns above. Using two coordinating patterns would work nicely too.

Here are the steps I went through to make my Pinwheel Fold Card.

Here are the steps I went through to make my Pinwheel Fold Card.

Instructions:

  1. Using either a glue stick or double sided tape, glue the two 8″ squares together in the center only. In order to let the papers bend without buckling, make sure the gluing is only in the center of the two squares and doesn’t extend out to where you will be folding (see figure 1 above).
  2. With a pencil, mark with a line the middle of the length and width of the square that will be the inside of the card (figure 2).
  3. Lay the 4″ card stock with the points of the square lining up with the pencil marks that show the middle of the larger square. Glue in place (figure 3).
  4. Fold up the outside paper against the inside square (figure 4).
  5. Repeat around each side of the square. Notice that there are 4 triangles made at the intersection of these folds (figure 5).
  6. Cut out the triangles (figure 6).
  7. Turn the card over. Fold the first pinwheel flap as shown in figure 7.
  8. Repeat for all 4 sides (figure 8).
  9. Turn the card over again and glue the message into the middle of the card (figure 9).
  10. Start folding the sides of the card up, one overlapping the next. Make sure you fold so that the result looks like a pinwheel (figure 10).
  11. When you get to the last flap, insert it under the first, like folding a box lid (figure 11).
  12. The finished Pinwheel Fold Card (figure 12).

In addition to working with the 8 inch squares, I also used some 6 inch origami squares of both printed and coordinating solid papers. Using the origami paper, which was already cut, made the cards go super fast. With the 6″ squares, I used a piece of 3 inch card stock for the inside square.

These Pinwheel Fold Cards were made from 2 sheets each of coordinating origami paper, one print and one solid.

These Pinwheel Fold Cards were made from 2 sheets each of coordinating origami paper, one print and one solid.

Note: The pinwheel folds keeps the two papers together, so no additional gluing is necessary after the first gluing in step one.

I hope you enjoy making your own Pinwheel Fold Cards.

Happy creating, Candy

Studio Snapshot – I Love You Accordion Card Books

For over a month I’ve been busy with family and helping my dad downsize and move. This has left me with little time to make art. The result is that I haven’t been replacing the art that has sold out of my studio.

Three I Love You Accordion Card Books. Each one is hand lettered with watercolor and gold accents.

Three I Love You Accordion Card Books.

This week I realized I sold out of my I Love You Accordion Card Books. I guess they were popular for Valentine’s Day gifts. So this week I worked on making three new ones. I won’t put them all in my studio at once. I’ll keep a couple here in my studio at home.

Each of my accordion card books has a cover that is covered in one of my original paste papers.

Each of my accordion card books has a cover that is covered in one of my original paste papers.

It feels good to be back in my studio again. Although my current schedule is still pretty busy, I’m hoping to be able to carve out a couple of hours a day to work on my art. I’ve been missing it.

I Love You Accordion Card Books.

I Love You Accordion Card Books. Because each book is an original, they are all just a little different.

Enjoy, Candy

DIY – Square Envelope With Interlocking Heart Closure

After designing my square Valentine’s Day card, I decided to make a square envelope to go with it. I wanted an easy envelope, but one with a little extra pizzaz. So here’s my square envelope with interlocking heart closure.

My square envelopes with interlocking heart closure.

My square envelopes with interlocking heart closure.

My valentine cards are 4 inches square. By trial and error, I found that a 6 inch square made the perfect size for my card to fit in.

First I located the center of my paper, then folded each of the corners up to the center.

First I located the center of my paper, then folded each of the corners up to the center.

I started with a 6″ square piece of paper. On the inside of the paper I drew pencil lines (from corner to corner) to find the center of the paper. I folded each of the corners of the square to the center of the paper (see photo above).

Next, I glued hearts to the outside corners of the square paper.

Next, I glued hearts to the outside corners of the square paper.

To make the interlocking hearts, I cut hearts out of gold card stock and slightly smaller hearts out of paste paper. Most any colored or decorated papers will work. I glued the gold hearts to the corners of the envelope. I glued so that the corner of the envelope just peeked out of the “v” of the heart.

Next, I glued the paste paper hearts on top of the gold hearts.

Next, I glued the paste paper hearts on top of the gold hearts.

Next I glued the slightly smaller paste paper hearts on the gold hearts. This was the first time I used Zig 2-Way Glue. It was like using liquid glue in a ball point pen. I liked the ability to be very accurate with the glue. For those of us who are usually messy with glue, this looks to be a great alternative.

My Valentine card now can slip into the envelope. The hearts interlock, sort of like the flaps of a cardboard box.

My Valentine card now can slip into the envelope. The hearts interlock, sort of like the flaps of a cardboard box.

These envelopes cannot be sent through the mail. The ones that I need to mail will have to be put into a larger envelope. That’s okay as I think these envelopes are too lovely to be spoiled by postal cancellations.

Close up of square envelope with heart closure.

Close up of square envelope with interlocking heart closure.

The envelopes can be made in different sizes, as long as they are squares. A 7.5″ square creates an envelope that’s perfect for a 5″ square card. Experiment with different sizes of envelopes and hearts. Have fun!

Close up of a square envelope with interlocking hearts on a paste paper background.

Close up of a square envelope with interlocking hearts on a paste paper background.

Scrapbook papers would make for great envelopes, hearts for the envelopes and cards too.

This photo shows the inside and outside of my valentine card as well as the square interlocking heart envelopes.

This photo shows the inside and outside of my valentine cards as well as the square interlocking heart envelopes.

Play with this envelope and see just how creative you can get.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – New Thank You Cards

I received a request to make some Thank You cards for our local Community Art Committee of which I am a member. There are times when we need to send out thank you’s and the committee thought it would be great to have it made by one of the artist members.

One of the new thank you cards for our Community Art Committee

One of the new thank you cards for our Community Art Committee

One of the members suggested using a photo of one of my lotus flowers. So, here’s what I made this past week. I hand lettered the “thank you” and scanned it into the computer. I then changed the color of the “thank you” to match the color of the lotus flower that I photographed. Photoshop is great!

One of the new thank you cards for the Community Art Committee

One of the new thank you cards for our Community Art Committee

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Printing My Own Greeting Cards

This past week I worked on replenishing my stock of greeting cards. I print, cut, fold and package my own greeting cards. I combine my calligraphy with either my paste papers or marbling or watercolors to create my cards.

Three of my greeting cards.

Three of my greeting cards.

I scan both my calligraphy and my painting and combine them in Photoshop. I then print them on my Epson 3000 printer which uses archival ink. I print my cards on 8 1/2″ by 11″ paper, score and fold the paper, then cut it to 5″ by 7″ with my trusty Olfa hand cutter.

I print my cards on letter sized card stock. Here are a few of the ones I printed this week.

I print my cards on letter sized card stock. Here are a few of the ones I printed this week.

It is somewhat labor intensive, but it allows me to make just the amount of cards I want. I only sell my cards in my own studio, so this works for me.

Framable calligraphy card - the heart never gets wrinkles

Framable calligraphy card – the heart never gets wrinkles

My cards are designed so that they look great when put in a 5″ by 7″ mat or frame. That’s why I call them Framables.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Thank You Card Books

Last Friday, during the First Friday Art Walk, I received an order for some Thank You Card Books. My customer loved the yellows and oranges. He said they were perfect colors for autumn.

These Thank You Card Books are a special order.

These Thank You Card Books are a special order.

So, this past week, I made a number of fall colors of Thank You Card Books. In addition to reminding me of autumn leaves, I think these colors are ever so cheerful and upbeat.

They are now packaged and waiting to be picked up.

Enjoy, Candy

DIY Ladybug Card – Perfect For Making With Children

Ladybugs are universally thought of to bring good luck. No one seems to know why ladybugs came to be viewed as lucky or why this is common in many different cultures. So after running across a wonderful ladybug quote, I decided I wanted to make it into a cute little card. The result is a project that is perfect for sitting down with some young children and making some ladybugs and cards them.

My Ladybug Card with a few extra ladybugs hanging around.

My Ladybug Card with a few extra ladybugs hanging around.

An alternative would be to make one of these cards and send it to a child along with some “extra” little ladybugs. These little ladybugs can be made in a variety of sizes and can be modified in a number of different ways. Have fun playing with them.

The above photo shows the steps to make a paper ladybug. I started with a 3" square of red paper, but they can be made any size.

The above photo shows the steps to make a paper ladybug. I started with a 3″ square of red paper, but they can be made any size.

Instructions for making a paper ladybug:

1. Cut a 3″ square out of a red piece of text weight paper.

2. Fold the paper into a triangle (#2 above)

3. Fold the bottom left corner up to the top of the triangle (#3 above)

4. Repeat with the right corner (#4 above)

5. Using a circle template (I used a spice jar lid) make a pencil line around the open end of your folded ladybug. See #5 above which shows the way the circle is drawn.

6. Cut along the pencil lines you made (#6 above)

7. Open up your folded paper and color the section that will be under the ladybug’s wings black. I used a black coptic marker, but any black marker will work. (#7 above)

8. Fold your ladybug back up and using a black marker, color her face black (#8 above)

9. Make black circles on her wings. You can also make white dots for her eyes. A white paint marker or gel marker works well for this (#9 above)

For the card, I drew a dashed line and wrote “Ladybug . . .” on the front and hand lettered the inside in my own ordinary printing. I think it would be fun for children to write the quote themselves and have it reduced on a photocopier for the card. Another possibility would be to do the writing on a computer.

Front of the Ladybug Card. On this ladybug, I trimmed her wings just a little to make a bit of a curve.

Front of the Ladybug Card. On this ladybug, I trimmed her wings just a little to make a bit of a curve.

After I finished my ladybug, I decided to curve her wings just a little. You can play around with other possibilities. You could make legs and antenna. Have fun with your ladybug. Make multiple ladybugs. Try making different sizes. Make other bugs in other colors. Play and enjoy!

The quote I found:

Ladybug . . . a good luck symbol. It’s believed she first came to earth by lightening sent by the Goddess of Love and Beauty. When she swoops in, it’s to remind us that life is short, and not let worries cloud a single day. Author Unknown

My Ladybug Card with a few extra ladybugs hanging around.

Perfect card to send to friends who love ladybugs or to the children in your life.

Enjoy, Candy

Tapered Roll Fold

A tapered roll fold is a type fold used in the printing industry for brochures. I thought this fold would work for either a book or a card. Here is what I created using this fold.

Finished tapered roll fold, perfect for a card or small book.

Finished tapered roll fold, perfect for a card or small book.

I started by cutting a piece of watercolor paper and cut it 5″ high, making it 5″ by 22″. I painted an almost rainbow like graduated wash on the paper and added a bit of sea salt.

This is how the watercolor paper looks while wet. I hav ejust sprinkled the salt on the paper.

This is how the watercolor paper looks while wet. I hav ejust sprinkled the salt on the paper.

This is how the watercolor looks when dried.

This is how the watercolor looks when dried.

After the paper dried, I cut off one end and folded at 4″. I then wrapped the paper around and folded until I had 5 sections. I cut off the remaining bit on the other end.

This shows the 5 folds and the pieces cut off each of the ends.

This shows the 5 folds and the pieces cut off each of the ends.

I cut the taper on three of the folds. See photo below.

Here the taper has been cut.

Here the taper has been cut.

All that’s left is to roll the paper around itself. There is so much potential in this fold. I’m thinking it could be a fun soft cover for a little book. It would make a great greeting card too.

Front of the tapered roll fold. How about a slit for the taper to slip into?

Front of the tapered roll fold. How about a slit for the taper to slip into?

I’m thinking that it could have a slit in the cover for the taper to slide into. I can see that I’m going to be playing with this fold for a while. There are so many things I could do with this.

Here's what the back of the tapered roll fold looks like.

Here’s what the back of the tapered roll fold looks like.

Vertically, the tapered roll fold looks a little like a purse.

Vertically, the tapered roll fold looks a little like a purse.

Vertical tapered roll fold as seen from the back.

Vertical tapered roll fold as seen from the back.

Note: If you make this fold, you will want to make sure you are making your folds with the direction of the grain of the paper. If you don’t know what that means, you can check out my blog post: Understanding Paper Grain Direction.

Enjoy, Candy

DIY – Paper Star Card

While I was cleaning up my studio last week, I came across some of my red, white and blue paper start that I made my Star Garland with. I decided the stars would look great sewn on a card, and I was right.

I used left over stars from my Star Garland to make this 4th of July card.

I used left over stars from my Star Garland to make this 4th of July card.

This is one of the few projects that went together just the way I thought it would. Nice when that happens.

I wanted my card 5″ x 7″ to fit an A-7 envelope. So, I cut my paper 7″ wide and 15″ high. I wanted an extra 5″ to turn under to cover my stitching. If you don’t mind your stitching showing, or if you want to paste a piece of paper over the stitching, cut the card 7″ wide by 10″.

My paper is 7" wide by 15" high. I have folded it in thirds so my finished card will be 5" by 7".

My paper is 7″ wide by 15″ high. I have folded it in thirds so my finished card will be 5″ by 7″ and fit into a standard A-7 envelope..

I printed “Happy 4th” in the Bermuda Squiggle typeface and colored in the left side of the squiggle in alternating blue and red. I used a dark blue embroidery thread to sew my stars.

Here I have started sewing my stars on my card.

Here I have started sewing my stars on my card.

I laid out my red, white and blue stars on my card and decided where I thought they would look good. With a white card, I thought two red, two blue and only one white set of stars looked really good together.

This photo shows a finished card and the reverse side of one that hasn't been covered up yet so you can see how the stitches look on the reverse side of the card.

Here is a finished card and the back side of one that hasn’t been covered up yet, so you can see how the stitches look on the back side of the card.

I folded two stars together, then sewed them on the card and then another and another. After I sewed the stars, I folded and glued the flap back to cover up the stitching which made for a clean looking card.

Two finished "Happy 4th" cards ready to be put in an envelope and sent.

Two finished “Happy 4th” cards ready to be put in an envelope and sent.

You could write Happy 4th by hand or use another font. I hope this sparks all sorts of ideas for you future cards.

Happy 4th, Candy

DIY – Pinwheel Fold Card

I saw a card that I liked the look of on the internet last week. There were no instructions on how to make it, so I made my own and the instructions to go with it. When I was done, I decided it looked like a pinwheel, so I named it the Pinwheel Fold Card.

One Pinwheel Fold Card open and one closed.

One Pinwheel Fold Card open and one closed.

Then I decided to google “pinwheel fold card” and found out that other people have made the card and called it the same name. I even found instructions on how to make them on YouTube. My instructions, however, are a bit different from those on YouTube. My instructions allow you to make this card using any size square. My instructions also doesn’t require straight and diagonal folding boards. Once you have made your first one, you realize that they’re really quite easy to make.

I made my Pinwheel Fold cards in two different sizes.

I made my Pinwheel Fold Cards in two different sizes.

The basic concept of this card is that there is an inside square and an outside square. The length of the side of the inside square is half the length of the outside square. If the outside square is 8″, then the inside square is 4″.

Here are the papers I am using to make a Pinwheel Fold Card.

Here are the papers I used to make my Pinwheel Fold Card.

I started with 2 text weight 8″ squares of paper,  a card stock 4″ square in gold and a 3.5″ square with the card message on it. You can see my choice of colors and patterns above. Using two coordinating patterns would work nicely too.

Here are the steps I went through to make my Pinwheel Fold Card.

Here are the steps I went through to make my Pinwheel Fold Card.

Instructions:

  1. Using either a glue stick or double sided tape, glue the two 8″ squares together in the center only. In order to let the papers bend without buckling, make sure the gluing is only in the center of the two squares and doesn’t extend out to where you will be folding (see figure 1 above).
  2. With a pencil, mark with a line the middle of the length and width of the square that will be the inside of the card (figure 2).
  3. Lay the 4″ card stock with the points of the square lining up with the pencil marks that show the middle of the larger square. Glue in place (figure 3).
  4. Fold up the outside paper against the inside square (figure 4).
  5. Repeat around each side of the square. Notice that there are 4 triangles made at the intersection of these folds (figure 5).
  6. Cut out the triangles (figure 6).
  7. Turn the card over. Fold the first pinwheel flap as shown in figure 7.
  8. Repeat for all 4 sides (figure 8).
  9. Turn the card over again and glue the message into the middle of the card (figure 9).
  10. Start folding the sides of the card up, one overlapping the next. Make sure you fold so that the result looks like a pinwheel (figure 10).
  11. When you get to the last flap, insert it under the first, like folding a box lid (figure 11).
  12. The finished Pinwheel Fold Card (figure 12).

In addition to working with the 8″ squares, I also used some 6″ origami squares of both printed and coordinating solid papers. Using the origami paper, which was already cut, made the cards go super fast. With the 6″ squares, I used a piece of 3″ card stock for the inside square.

These Pinwheel Fold Cards were made from 2 sheets each of coordinating origami paper, one print and one solid.

These Pinwheel Fold Cards were made from 2 sheets each of coordinating origami paper, one print and one solid.

Note: The pinwheel folds keeps the two papers together, so no additional gluing is necessary after the first gluing in step one.

I hope you enjoy making your own Pinwheel Fold Cards.

Happy Summer, Candy