Category Archives: Decor

Paper Illuminated Online Class – Weeks 5 & 6

You may wonder why weeks 5 & 6 come before weeks 3 and 4. Well, there were a few equipment and materials glitches that happened due my traveling. They will show up later, but this is the foldable paper chochin lamp that I made this past week.

I collaged my collapsable the paper on my chochin lamp rather than using the template Helen provided.

Week 5 was building the armature (which can be used over again and again). Week 6 was making the lamp shade. I collaged mine rather than following the instructions exactly. I like the way it came out.

Collapsable paper cochin lamp.

The chochin lampshade can be made in different shapes and sizes. There are so many different possibilities with this type of lampshade. My mind is swimming with possibilities.

Enjoy, Candy

More Traveling Ahead

After the two months of traveling I did recently, I’ve decided I want to travel more, a lot more. I’ve been home less than a month and I’m itching to get traveling again.

Paper lamp shade I made from Helen Hiebert’s Paper Illuminated online class.

The only real paper art I’ve done since I got back home is the paper lampshade from week 1 of Helen Hiebert’s online class, Paper Illuminated. (Filling out 1040 forms for my dad’s and my taxes don’t qualify as paper art.) This is a six week class, and I’ll keep you posted with the projects I make. Since I’ll be taking off soon for the southwest, I will be taking the supplies with me so I can keep working on the class projects as I travel.

I love how the light shows through the paper on this lamp shade.

I used the paper for this lamp shade that was included in Helen’s kit. It almost matches perfectly the switch plates I covered with paper a few years back. You can see my switch plate in the above two photos. Here’s the link to my blog post about covering them: Paper Covered Switch Plates.

Great instructions from Helen Hiebert for making this lamp shade in her online Paper Illuminated class.

I am sure this traveling is going to have an effect on my art. I just don’t know what it will be right now. I’m sorting through my art supplies and trying to figure out which ones I’ll want to travel with. I’ll keep you posted.

Enjoy, Candy

Online Class: Paper Illuminated by Helen Hiebert

A number of years ago I took a class from paper artist, Helen Hiebert, just before she moved to Colorado. I learned a lot and enjoyed the class immensely. Helen is a great teacher.

This is the shoji screen we will be making in Helen Hiebert’s Paper Illuminated online class.

I thought I’d like to take another class from Helen. However, Colorado is a bit far for me to travel to take a class.

This is the bendable paper lamp we will be making in Helen Hiebert’s Paper Illuminated online class.

So when I heard Helen was going to do an online class, I jumped at the opportunity to sign up for it. It starts on March 8, and I expect to be back home from my travels by then (thankfully). P.S. There is an early bird discount available if you sign up before February 1.

This is the chochin lampshade we will be making in Helen Hiebert’s Paper Illuminated online class.

I am going to clear my schedule (as much as I can) so I can have time to play with the structures Helen is going to teach. It’s a 5 week class, so it shouldn’t be too difficult to find enough time during each week. It’s so easy for me to overbook my time, but this is going to be so worth it.

This is the wraparound lampshade we will be making in Helen Hiebert’s Paper Illuminated online class.

There’s going to be a private Facebook page for those of us who are taking the class. It’s going to be a lot of fun seeing what everyone is doing. We’ll be able to ask questions of Helen too.

These are the five projects we’ll be making in Helen Hiebert’s Paper Illuminated online class.

In addition to the class, I’ve ordered the Supply Kit for the class to make it easier for me to make the projects. If you take the class, you will need a few other materials like a cutting mat, straight pins, a craft knife and such. You can check out the materials need on Helen’s website link below.

Materials in the supply kit for Helen Hiebert’s Paper Illuminated online class.

If you’re interested in taking this class, or want more information on it, see: Helen Hiebert’s Online Class: Paper Illuminated.

Enjoy, Candy

Paper Ornaments

On my travels, I found some Christmas trees with paper ornaments. The first trees I found were in the city of Ferndale, California. There were many trees filled with ornaments lining the downtown streets.

I found lots of paper ornaments on Christmas trees in downtown Ferndale, California.

The paper ornaments were made by children and laminated so that they could hold up to the outside weather.

I found lots of paper ornaments on Christmas trees in downtown Ferndale, California.

I love how festive and personal these trees feel. And they look like they’d be a fun, easy project to do with a child.

Paper cranes adorn this Christmas tree.

The paper cranes on the tree above are larger than most of the paper cranes I’ve seen. These cranes were made with 9″ origami paper rather than the usual 6″ origami paper.

Enjoy, Candy

DIY Paper Holiday Ornament

While I’m busy cutting paper and packing for a two month trip (more about that later), I thought you would enjoy this cute paper ornament compliments of Helen Hiebert and Mulberry Paper and More.

Check out Helen Hiebert’s blog post for the instructions to make these cute paper ornaments.

Helen Hiebert shared the instructions for making these ornaments on her blog post: 25 Days of Paper 2016: Day 14.

 

Enjoy, Candy

DIY – Autumn Leaves Paper Wreaths

While I’m busy getting ready for a local fundraiser, I thought I would share some of my autumn paper wreathes. These are fun to make.

The colors here say "Thanksgiving" to me.

The colors here say “Thanksgiving” to me.

I’ve made three different autumn paper leaves over the years. While I love them all, the one above is my favorite.

My finished Autumn Paper Leaves Wreath.

Autumn Leaves Paper Wreath

Some time back, I saw a burlap-leaf wreath kit in a catalog. Now I don’t particularly care for burlap, but it got me thinking that it would be fun to make a wreath of my own using paper leaves. I have no idea how big the wreat was in the kit, and I can’t even remember which catalog I saw it in But that’s usually the best way for me to go about a project —with a semi-vague idea of what I want to make. That way I’m on my own and not trying to make something exactly the way someone else did.

I started by cutting a piece of cardboard into a circle. I used a dinner plate as my template.

I started by cutting a piece of cardboard into a circle. I used a dinner plate as my template.

This was just a fun project where I didn’t worry about using archival materials. Some of the papers are probably archival, but the cardboard I used for the back of the wreath is definitely not. I used one of my dinner plates as a template for the circle. A compass would work as well, but I tend to work with whatever is close at hand when I jump into a project.

Here is how I started my first paper wreath.

Here is how I started my first paper wreath.

For my leaves, I made a template out of card stock. After making a shape I liked, I cut it out of the card stock. The template is the shape of half a leaf, so I would cut out a piece of paper 1 and 1/2″ wide and 3 and 1/2″ long, fold it in half, trace around my leaf template in pencil then cut it out. Do you have any idea how many leaves I had to make? Cutting out all those leaves took a lot of time. But, I love the result. I used PVA as my glue because it was nearest to me, but just about any craft glue would work. You could even use a glue gun.

This was my first Autumn Leaves Paper Wreath.

This was my first Autumn Leaves Paper Wreath.

My first wreath came out fairly well, but it turned out that I hadn’t alligned the leaves as well as I could have. To solve that problem on my second wreath, I drew concentric circles about 1″ apart and lot of radius lines so I could make sure my leaves were all pointing towards the center of the circle.

Here you can see the concentric circles I drew on the cardboard to help me line up the leaves.

Here you can see the concentric circles I drew on the cardboard to help me line up the leaves.

It kind of looks like a dart board or archery target. I also made my cardboard base a bit larger as I decided I wanted a slightly larger wreath than the first one. Mat board or foam core could also work for the backing of the wreath.

My finished Autumn Paper Leaves Wreath.

My finished Autumn Paper Leaves Wreath

While it takes a little bit of time to cut out the leaves, I think the result is worth the effort.

Enjoy , Candy

 

 

Memories Of My Dad: Tea Bag Folding Holiday Garland

Every Monday I my dad and I would go out to his favorite restaurant for lunch. While we would order different items from the menu, our beverages were always the same. He would order English Breakfast Tea and I would order Green Tea. When I started folding tea bag wrappers early this year, we started saving our tea bag wrappers from our Monday lunches.

Holiday Garland made from tea bag wrappers. I sewed them together with gold thread.

Holiday Garland made from tea bag wrappers. They are sewed together with gold thread.

I realized that our tea bag wrappers were red and green, the perfect color combination for the holiday season. I played around with different combinations, all green and all red, but my favorite was the red and green together.

Our tea bag wrappers along with the front and back of the folded rosettes.

Our tea bag wrappers along with the front and back of the folded rosettes.

My original plan was to make red and green tea bag garlands to decorate my dad’s Christmas tree. I showed him my idea and he loved it. Unfortunately my dad passed away a little over a month ago. I am now making these garlands as a memory of our Monday lunches together.

Close up of the folded rosette.

Close up of the folded rosette.

Each garland has eight 2″ by 2″ squares cut from the front of the tea bag wrapper. You can see how they are folded in the above photo. The pieces are then glued together to make the rosette.

Front and back of the rosettes along with the folded squares ready to become another rosette.

Front and back of the rosettes along with the folded squares ready to become another rosette.

If you are interested in making some of these yourself, check out my blog post: DIY – Tea Bag Folding & Paper Origami Rosettes.

Start creating your own memories!

Enjoy, Candy

My Inspiration Wall

The two things in my studio that got the most attention during the Ashland Open Studio Tour this past weekend were my art supplies packed into a “bar” and my magnetic cords that I use for my vision or inspiration wall. I’ve already showed my art supplies “bar”, so today I’m sharing my inspiration wall.

My Inspiration Wall is three magnetic cables with tiny magnets to hold my paper art and ideas.

My Inspiration Wall is three magnetic cables with tiny magnets to hold my paper art and ideas.

First, I have a confession. I clutter. However, I don’t like clutter. So, my clutter tends to be down on the floor while my walls and the area I look at regularly look pretty good. The thought of having a bulletin board that, knowing me, would turn into a mass of clutter, wasn’t something I could live with. So I lived without an inspiration wall for years. Until, I found these wonderful magnetic cables.

Close up of chiyogami paper samples that remind me of autumn.

Close up: chiyogami paper samples that remind me of autumn.

I have 3 of these wonderful cables in my studio, right next to my drafting table. I hung my magnetic cables on white cup hooks. They are so easy to change out whatever inspires me at the moment, or something I don’t want to forget to do, like correspondence or a project I’m mulling around in my mind.

Used tea bags. I have no idea what these will turn into, but I just love the stained, muted colors and textures.

Close up: used tea bags. I have no idea what these will turn into, but I just love the stained, muted colors and textures.

The cables come in blue, pink and lime green. They have heavy duty little magnets that really grip the magnetic cord. You can also buy extra magnets if you like. One little magnet easily holds a regular sized manilla file folder, so they really are powerful little magnets.

I found them at Paper and Ink Arts (online). They were $8.00 each, plus shipping. Paper and Ink Arts just updated their website and although they were on their website two days ago, I can’t find them today. I suggest calling them and asking about them if you are interested in buying some.

For photos of my “art” bar: Studio Organization

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Making Lots Of Colorful Long Stemmed Hearts

On my last blog post, I gave directions for making long stemmed hearts. Somehow, many of you who subscribe to my blog never received that post. I don’t understand the technology of why that happened, but here’s the link to the DIY instructions: DIY Long Stemmed Hearts.

While these are not the customary colors for hearts, I really like them together as a bouquet.

While these are not the customary colors for hearts, I really like them together as a bouquet.

For that blog post, I made a dozen red long stemmed hearts. And seeing that I had a whole lot of colorful fade resistant papers sitting around my studio, I couldn’t resist making lots more long stemmed hearts is ever so many different colors.

These paper long stemmed hearts won't wilt and you don't have to remember to water them either.

One dozen Long Stemmed Hearts as shown in last week’s blog post.

As I stated last week, I use Pop Tone colors from French Paper Company, located in Niles, Michigan. I had to order directly from the company to get all the colors I wanted.

Purple and pink Long Stemmed Hearts.

Purple and pink Long Stemmed Hearts.

One of the things I love about these hearts is that I don’t have to remember to water them. I can leave for a week or two without worrying about them. No wilting. No watering. As a matter of fact, it’s not advisable to water them at all.

I love the bright colors of these Long Stemmed Hearts.

I love the bright colors of these Long Stemmed Hearts.

All week, I just kept making all different colors of folded paper hearts. I kept trying out how different color combinations looked together. It was so much fun!

Green and yellow Long Stemmed Hearts.

Green and yellow Long Stemmed Hearts.

The vases I used for most of today’s photos used to hold balsamic vinegar. They make great vases. I bought the balsamic vinegar at Trader Joe’s years ago. I don’t know if they still sell it in these glass bottles. I added the band of red cord to coordinate the vase with the wrapping of embroidery thread on the hearts.

Pastel Long Stemmed Hearts.

Pastel Long Stemmed Hearts.

I have also found lovely vases at yard sales and estate sales. Look around and you’re likely to find the perfect vase for your Long Stemmed Hearts.

Lots of colorful Long Stemmed Hearts.

Lots of colorful Long Stemmed Hearts.

For instructions, see my blog post: DIY Long Stemmed Hearts.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Playing With My New Chiyogami Papers

This past week I’ve been making paper lotus flowers, origami mandalas and paper wrapped pencils out of the new Chiyogami papers I received from Washi Arts. I shared the photo of the papers I received on my last post and here is what I’ve been doing with them.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

I love these papers! The colors are spectacular and they fold beautifully. Yes, they are expensive, but so worth it.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

If you haven’t tried Chiyogami paper, treat yourself to a sheet. It’s a wonderful experience.

Enjoy, Candy

DIY – Red, White & Blue Paper Balls

As I unpacked my box of seasonal decorations, I came across a number of red, white and blue paper decorations. Every year I try and add new decorations for each holiday. These are the red, white and blue paper balls that I made last year. They look great combined with the Red, White & Blue Paper Stars that I made last week. These are perfect table decorations for the 4th of July!

Here I have put 5 paper balls in a glass vase. Loving the look!

Here I put 5 paper balls in a glass vase. Loving the look!

My first experience making paper balls happened by accident. I was actually trying to make a paper flower. I let go at the wrong time and the flower kind of exploded. I actually loved that the explosion could, with just a little manipulation, produce a ball. I decided to see if I could replicate my accident, this time on purpose. I decided to try making balls using red, white and blue paper. This is the wondrous result.

Here I have put the balls in glass dessert dishes.

Here I put the balls in glass dessert dishes.

I used 60# and 70# text weight papers. These were a bit heavier than the recycled book paper I used with my “accident” and required just a bit more manipulation. When I used the recycled book paper, the paper just exploded into a ball. This time I had to carefully pull apart the folds, but the result was the same, a lovely paper ball.

The larger paper balls are made from 3″ squares and the smaller ones are made from 2.5″ squares. Any size square will work. I used 15 squares for each of my balls.

2015 DIY Red White and Blue Paper Balls 4 copy

Instructions:

1. Start with about 15 pieces of square paper. Fold in half, then half again. Fold one flap up from center fold to make a triangle. Repeat with second flap. See photo #1 above.

Note: Make sure all folds are  on one side of the folded paper and all loose ends are on the other.

2. Make a template out of card stock and round the top of the folded triangle as in photo #2 above. You are cutting  and rounding the loose ends of the paper.

3. Glue one rounded triangle side of  a folded paper to a second folded paper (photo #3 above).

4. Continue until all 15 pieces have been glued together (photo #4 above).

5. Starting at one end, open up one of the triangles as in photo #5 above. Opened, it will form a flower-like circle.

6. Continue opening the next triangle, and the next, etc. (photo #6 above).

7. A little twisting is sometimes needed to make the ball shape. Photo #7 shows the completed folded paper ball.

The red and blue paper balls are made from 3" papers and the white ball from 2.5" paper.

The red and blue paper balls are made from 3″ square papers and the white ball from 2.5″ square papers.

Here’s to happy accidents, Candy

DIY – Paper Shamrock Wreath

I recently found the shamrock wreath I made last year (Studio Snapshot – St. Patrick’s Day Paper Shamrock Wreath). It was looking a little shabby, so I decided to make another and include instructions so you can make one too.

My new Paper Shamrock Wreath, perfect for St. Patrick's Day.

My new Paper Shamrock Wreath, perfect for St. Patrick’s Day.

Like last year, I decided on two colors of green and one of white. Unlike last year, I decided I wanted to use a heavier card stock for my paper. Last year I made my strips of paper 1.5″ wide. This year I made them 1″ wide. It’s totally up to you to decide what width of strips you want to make your shamrock.

Last year's Paper Shamrock Wreath on left and 1" by 12" strips of green and white paper that will become my new wreath this year.

Last year’s Paper Shamrock Wreath on left and 1″ by 12″ strips of green and white paper that will become my new wreath this year.

From 12″ square card stock, I cut cut seven 1″ strips from each of my three colors. I used two greens and one white. I left the dark green 12″ in length, cut the white to 10″ and the light green to 8″. Try different widths and lengths of paper. Play around to find the combination of lengths and widths that give you a pleasing shamrock.

I stapled one set of colored strips to form a teardrop.

I stapled one set of colored strips to form a teardrop.

Holding a set of each of the three colors (longest on the outside, shortest on the inside) I used a stapler to make a teardrop shape. See photo above. I then made 6 teardrops.

The above photo shows where I scored the lines for the stem of my shamrock.

The above photo shows my six teardrops plus where I scored the lines for the stem of my shamrock.

I scored and folded my 7th set of colored strips (see above photo) to make my shamrock stem. I then stapled my stem like I did with the teardrops.

I used a glue gun to glue two tear drops together, ending up with 3 heart shaped leaves for my shamrock.

I used a glue gun to glue two tear drops together, ending up with 3 heart shaped leaves for my shamrock.

I used a glue gun for my next steps. I glued two teardrops together to make each of the heart shaped leaves. Then I glued the three leaves and the stem to a round piece of card stock (see it in the center of the above photo).

I folded a paper medallion for the center of my Paper Shamrock Wreath. I glued a few beads in the center.

I folded a paper medallion for the center of my Paper Shamrock Wreath. I glued a few beads in the center.

I folded a 1″ by 11″ strip of text weight paper into an accordion. I then glued the ends together and held the accordion into a circle and glued the back of the medallion with hot glue. I held it for a few minutes until the glue dried. Done! I may add a ribbon to hang it like I did last year.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Ink Jet Magnet Sheets

I have not been working in my studio this past week. Instead, I’ve been helping my dad downsize. While there have been difficult decisions to make, I’ve also come across lots of wonderful memories in the process.

I was able to print out 28 of the bird designs on each magnet sheet.

I was able to print out 28 of the bird designs on each magnet sheet.

One of those memories was finding a magnet I made with one of my mom’s Chinese brush painting birds on it. I made hundreds of these little magnets to give away to everyone who attended my mother’s exhibit of her Chinese brush paintings. I scanned the image of a bird she had painted and printed 28 images per page of it on an 8.5″ by 11″  ink jet magnet sheet. I then cut them out carefully with a craft knife.

I was able to print 28 of these little magnets out of a single 8.5" by 11" sheet.

I was able to print 28 of these little magnets out of a single 8.5″ by 11″ sheet.

It was my mom’s first showing of her work. She considered herself a student, not an artist. However, the show was a success and she received lots of positive feedback from those who saw the show. Even now, over 10 years later, friends still comment on how they still have and treasure the little bird magnet.

These sheets of magnet paper are fairly thin and easy to cut. They are great for refrigerator decorations, school lockers and metal doors. I’m sure there are lots more creative uses for these sheets than I’ve not thought of.

Enjoy, Candy

DIY – Making Heart Garlands

I think what I like most about Valentine’s Day is hearts. I love hearts! And around Valentine’s Day, I get to play with them for weeks on end. Over the years I have made a number of different heart garlands. So here’s a bunch of them along with instructions or links to the instructions from past blog posts.

I used red, dark pink and purple papers along with some beads to make this paper folded heart garland.

My Folded Paper Heart Garland is made with red, dark pink and purple papers along with thread and some beads.

Below are some photos of a super easy heart garland. All that is necessary are strips of paper and a stapler. It’s a perfect activity to share with a young child.

A strip of paper and a stapler are all you need to make this heart garland.

A strip of paper and a stapler are all you need to make this heart garland.

For this garland I cut 3/4″ strips out of a couple of 8 1/2″ by 11″ red papers. You can use multiple colors to make you heart garland. You can use double sided scrapbook pages too.

You can see the staples on this photo.

You can see the staples on this photo. The staples are actually hot pink staples which were a gift from a friend. I love how they look on this garland.

And, should you want something a little more “professional” looking, just use glue instead of a stapler. Glue stick dries quicker than a liquid glue, but any glue will work.

Red and white heart garland made with strips of paper 1/2" x 6"

Red and white heart garland made with strips of paper 1/2″ x 6″. I used glue stick rather than staples on this garland.

Another heart garland can be made by sewing paper hearts, like I have with the heart garlands below.  While I prefer to sew by hand, you could use a sewing machine which would speed up the process.

"String of Hearts" hand sewn with metallic gold thread (about 6' long)

Rainbow Heart Garland, perfect for any time of year, not just Valentine’s Day!

I like to fold 2 hearts together and sew them with a coordinating thread. I use either embroidery thread or waxed linen thread. I add a few beads at the bottom and a loop at the top.

My Spring Heart Garland has bright colors that remind me Spring flowers that are now blooming.

My Spring Heart Garland has bright colors that remind me Spring flowers.

By changing the colors of the hearts, I have made heart garlands for more than just Valentine’s Day. I have used green hearts for St. Patrick’s Day, spring colored to celebrate spring and pastel pink and purple hearts for Easter. You could even make a red and green garland for the Christmas season. You can find instructions for this type of garland on my blog post: DIY Saint Patrick’s Day Paper Garland.

My finished garland is about 8 feet long.

Heart garland in colors perfect for St. Patrick’s Day.

Did I mention that I love heart garlands? My folded heart garland is my favorite of all garlands. I made this one last year and I have had it hanging in my studio ever since. Instructions on my blog post: DIY Folded Paper Heart Garland.

Folded Paper Heart Garland finished.

Folded Paper Heart Garland finished.

Not exactly a heart garland, but you could make multiple and make them into one, is the hanging heart ornament. Instructions on my blog post: DIY Hanging Paper Heart Ornaments.

One of my paper Valentine Hanging Heart Ornaments for the Ashland Art Center front window.

One of my paper Valentine Hanging Heart Ornaments.

Wishing you all a Happy Valentine’s Day!

Enjoy, Candy

DIY Three Dimensional Paper Star

This star is folded from a piece of paper in the form of an octagon. I made my octagon with each of the eight sides 2″ in length. If you don’t know how to make an octagon, I’ve included a template that you can download at the end of this blog post.

I love these Three Dimensional Paper Stars.

I love these Three Dimensional Paper Stars. I used metallic papers to make them.

Note: If you don’t know how to score and fold, check out my blog post: How To Score And Fold Paper. It’s important to know since this star requires a lot of scoring and folding. It also explains mountain and valley folds if you are unfamiliar with them.

Check out my blog post on How To Fold And Score Paper to help you with making this Three Dimensional Paper Star.

Check out my blog post How To Fold And Score Paper to help you with making this Three Dimensional Paper Star.

I suggest using a light weight card stock to make this Paper Star. Heavier paper can be used, but I suggest starting out with a light weight card stock for your first few stars because it is much easier to work with.

I start with an octagon to make this Three Dimensional Paper Star.

I start with an octagon to make this Three Dimensional Paper Star.

Directions (see photo above with the corresponding number for instructions below):

  1. Start scoring and folding four folds where you connect the points of the octagon across from each other.
  2.  Turn the paper over. With the paper turned over, you now have 4 mountain folds. Now make 4 valley folds by scoring and folding the center points of each of the octagon sides to its opposite side. I made my octagon with 2″ sides (see Octagon Template at end of this post).
  3. Turn paper over. Cut 3/4″ into each of the valley folds, the folds that are half way between the points. Then score and fold from the bottom of the 3/4″ cut to the point of the octagon.
  4. Continue around the entire octagon.
  5. Glue the tabs you have made together. I used a glue gun, but any paste or glue will work. Note: The closer together you glue the tabs, the more dimensional the star will be.
  6. The star is now finished. You can glue a back on the star if you wish.
These Three Dimensional Paper Stars are so much fun to make!

These Three Dimensional Paper Stars are so much fun to make!

Download: Octagon Template (this is the outline of 2 octagons that you can use to cut out and make this star)

Note: If you get confused about turning the paper over and getting the mountain and valley folds confused, don’t panic. Just refold the paper so it comes out the right way.

Enjoy, Candy