Category Archives: Paste paper

Studio Snapshot – Getting Ready For Ashland Open Studio Tour

This past week I’ve been cleaning my house and studio to get it ready for the Ashland Open Studio Tour. I’m opening my home studio to the public this next weekend. It’s a first for me and I’m a little anxious about it.

The box I made from one of my paste papers to hold the Tour Passports for the drawing.

The box I made from one of my paste papers to hold the Tour Passports for the drawing.

The only paper art I made this past weekend was the box to hold the Tour Passports. Each of the studios need to have a box to collect the passports. Two passports will be drawn, one for two tickets to A Taste of Ashland and another for $100 towards the purchase of local artwork.

Now I’m back to cleaning and organizing.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – More Playing With Paper Cutting

I haven’t spent much time in my studio this past week as I was camping in the high desert of Oregon. It was a wonderful time for me to relax and commune with nature. It was very restorative and I now have a lot more art energy pent up. I’m ready to start working on my art with a new vigor.

After cutting these flowers, I put paste papers behind the cut out portions to give them each unique colors and patterns.

After cutting these flowers, I put paste papers behind the cut out portions to give them each unique colors and patterns.

What time I did spend in my studio was playing around with the paper cutting I started last month. I made a few more flower designs and played with putting some of my paste papers behind them the cut out areas.

A single hand cut flower backed with painted paste paper.

A single hand cut flower backed with painted paste paper.

I like the look of these and will continue to explore imitrex paper cutting. I am sure this is just the beginning of a new addition to my paper addiction.

Hand cut flowers backed with painted paste paper.

Hand cut flowers backed with painted paste paper.

For details about how I cut my cards, check out my blog post: DIY – Playing With Paper Cutting.

A single hand cut flower backed with painted paste paper.

A single hand cut flower backed with painted paste paper.

I photographed my cards on one of my paste papers. To learn more about my paste papers, check out my blog post: Making Paste Papers: Part One.

Hand cut flowers backed with painted paste paper.

Hand cut flowers backed with painted paste paper.

Enjoy, Candy

Nuptial Spirit Vessel – The Process

Last summer I received a commission to make one of my spirit vessels for a wedding. I posted a photo of the paste papers that were chosen for the vessel and asked for ideas as to what to call this type of vessel. After many suggestions on my blog and from friends, I finally settled on calling it a Nuptial Spirit Vessel.

Nuptial Spirit Vessel, Safe Harbor.

Nuptial Spirit Vessel, Safe Harbor.

Now that it has been delivered to the bride and groom, I can share the photos of its making. It started with blue, teal and silver paste papers.

Paste papers cut and folding started for the Nuptial Spirit Vessel, Safe Harbor.

Paste papers cut and folding started for the Nuptial Spirit Vessel, Safe Harbor.

I chose to write the messages for this vessel in copperplate, rather than the italic that I use for the Earth Spirit Vessels. Because copperplate is traditionally used for weddings, it seemed fitting for a Nuptial Spirit Vessel.

Here are some of the 25 messages I calligraphed for inclusion into the vessel.

Here are some of the 25 messages I calligraphed for inclusion into the vessel.

The messages were chosen specifically for the two newlyweds by the person who commissioned the vessel.

The start of Nuptial Spirit Vessel, Safe Harbor.

The start of Nuptial Spirit Vessel, Safe Harbor.

I start making my vessels at the bottom and work up. The above photo shows the vessel with four rows completed.

A closer look at the first few rows of this Nuptial Spirit Vessel.

A closer look at the first few rows of this Nuptial Spirit Vessel.

I continue adding pieces, one row at a time. I add one row, fiddle with making sure everything is round and just the way I want, then glue each individual piece of paper.

Here I've added another couple of rows to the Nuptial Spirit Vessel.

Here I’ve added a few more rows to Nuptial Spirit Vessel, Safe Harbor. This is looking inside.

The above photo is looking into the center of the vessel from above. Its shape isn’t visible from this photo.

This is the look of the outside of the Nuptial Vessel. It's looking at it upside down.

This is the look of the outside of the Nuptial Vessel. It’s looking at it upside down.

The above two photos are from the same stage of completion. The second photo shows the outside of the vessel, though it’s upside down in the photo so you can see what the outside looks like at this point in its construction.

Now the Nuptial Vessel is a little further along. Looking down at the inside.

Now the Nuptial Vessel is a little further along. Looking down at the inside.

The more rows I add, the more the shape becomes apparent. The size of the hole in the bottom of the vessel actually changes shape as the vessel gets larger.

You can finally see how the outside of the Nuptial Vessel is taking shape.

You can finally see how the outside of the Nuptial Vessel is taking shape.

The above two photos show the vessel at the same stage of completion. You can see how the shape is starting to show.

Now it's time to choose the burl wood for the base of the Nuptial Vessel.

Now it’s time to choose the burl wood for the base of the Nuptial Vessel.

All my spirit vessels have burl wood bases. The photo above shows the different pieces of burl wood I looked at before deciding on the one I liked best for this vessel.

Nuptial Spirit Vessel, Safe Harbor.

Finished Nuptial Spirit Vessel, Safe Harbor.

I have been told that the bride and groom absolutely loved their Nuptial Spirit Vessel and were actually moved to tears. It gives me great joy to know that my art has touched the heart of others.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – DIY Gift Card Origami Envelope

What do you get for a high school or college grad? These days more and more people are giving either money or gift cards. So, I decided to make some good looking envelopes for those gift cards.

These origami envelopes are the perfect size to hole a gift card.

These origami envelopes are the perfect size to hole a gift card.

A couple of weeks ago on my blog post, DIY Origami Envelopes, I mentioned that they could be made in different sizes, depending on what size square you started with. I took my own advice and played with different sizes and found a perfect size square to make envelopes for gift cards.

These origami envelopes can be made the perfect size to hold gift cards.

These origami envelopes can be made the perfect size to hold gift cards.

Start with a slightly larger than 5″ square piece of text weight paper. I used a 5 and 1/8 inch square. Not all gift cards are exactly the same size, so I used a square slightly larger than 5″ so hopefully any gift card will fit in it.

These origami envelopes can be made the perfect size to hold gift cards.

These origami envelopes can be made the perfect size to hold gift cards.

I demonstrated how to make these gift card origami envelopes last Friday during the First Friday Art Walk. For my envelopes, I printed out digital prints of my paste papers on 20# copy paper. You can find lovely papers at art supply stores and scrapbook stores.

I love these origami envelopes! They can be made the perfect size to hold gift cards.

I love these origami envelopes! They can be made the perfect size to hold gift cards.

See more of my origami envelopes along with links to both video and print instructions on my blog post: DIY Origami Envelopes.

Happy folding, Candy

DIY Origami Envelope

These origami envelopes, made from a square piece of paper, were showcased, along with both a diagram and video instructions, on Paula Beardell Krieg’s blog, Playful Bookbinding and Paper Works. She told me my envelopes for National Letter Writing Month were her inspiration.

These origami envelopes were each made from a square piece of paper.

These origami envelopes were each made from a square piece of paper.

Well, naturally, I had to try making these wonderful envelopes. And while they will not be able to be sent through the mail, they make lovely envelopes for enclosure cards and notes and gift cards and more.

Thanks to Paula Beardell Krieg for introducing me to these origami envelopes.

Thanks to Paula Beardell Krieg for introducing me to these origami envelopes.

For my envelopes, I started with an 8″ square piece of paper. You can use any size square for your envelope. An 8″ square will make an envelope approximately 3.5″ by 5.75″. That’s what I used to make all the envelopes shown in this blog post.

These origami envelopes are addictive. They are easy after you get the hang of the folding.

These origami envelopes are addictive. They are easy after you get the hang of the folding them.

Those of you who read my blog regularly, know I love making paste papers. Since I never know what I am going to want to make and what weight paper I’ll be wanting to use, I scan my paste papers so I can use them for a variety of projects. And that’s exactly what I did for these origami envelopes.

You can make these origami envelopes either a square or pointed tip for the envelope flat to fit behind.

You can make these origami envelopes with either a square or pointed tip for the envelope flat to fit behind.

I found that 20# bond paper (regular photocopy paper) was my preferred paper for folding these origami envelopes. So, I printed my paste paper designs on photocopy paper. They folded easily once I got the hang of folding them. I did make a mess of my first two, but it went smoothly from then on.

These origami envelopes are fun to make and quite addictive, too.

These origami envelopes are fun to make and quite addictive, too.

Instructions, both a diagram and a video, are on Paula Beardall Krieg’s blog: Playful Bookbinding and Paper Works. Thanks, Paula, for the wonderful instructions.

Happy folding, Candy

 

 

 

DIY – Puffy Pentagon Box

It’s that time again . . . chocolate is in the air as Ashland prepares for the Oregon Chocolate Festival which starts on Friday. Last year I designed the Clover Fold Box to fit a single Dagoba Chocolate Taster Square. This year I designed the Puffy Pentagon Box which will also nicely hold a Taster Square.

These Puffy Pentagon Boxes are perfect to hold a Chocolate Dagoba Taster Square.

These Puffy Pentagon Boxes are the perfect size to hold a Chocolate Dagoba Taster Square.

I have included a template at the end of this blog post that you can download to make your own Puffy Pentagon Boxes. Print the template on the back of a decorated paper, then cut and fold. I suggest using card stock for best results.

Five Puffy Pentagon Boxes made from my paste papers.

Five Puffy Pentagon Boxes made from my paste papers.

There’s no glue or tape or ribbon needed to hold this box together. It’s a little tricky to close the box at first, but once you have done once or twice, it becomes easy.

Dagoba Chocolate Taster Squares fit nicely into these Puffy Pentagon boxes. They make perfect hostess gifts.

Dagoba Chocolate Taster Squares fit nicely into these Puffy Pentagon boxes. They make perfect hostess gifts.

These little boxes with a little chocolate inside make perfect hostess gifts.

Puffy Pentagon Box

Puffy Pentagon Box made from one of my paste papers.

Since these boxes store flat, you can make a bunch at a time and store them. They’ll be ready to puff into action whenever there is a need. Of course, you need to make sure you haven’t eaten all the chocolate or whatever you have to go in them.

Puffy Pentagon Box made from one of my paste papers.

Puffy Pentagon Box made from one of my paste papers.

Puffy Pentagon Box made from one of my paste papers.

Puffy Pentagon Box made from one of my paste papers.

Puffy Pentagon Box made from one of my paste papers.

Puffy Pentagon Box made from one of my paste papers.

Puffy Pentagon Box made from one of my paste papers.

Puffy Pentagon Box made from one of my paste papers.

Fold the flaps in like shown above. After the first couple of times, it becomes easy.

Fold the flaps in like shown above. After the first couple of times, it becomes fairly easy.

For more information about Dagoba Chocolate (which has its facilities in Ashland, Oregon): DagobaChocolate.com

For more information about paste papers: Making Paste Papers: Part One

Template: Puffy Pentagon Box

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Printing My Own Greeting Cards

This past week I worked on replenishing my stock of greeting cards. I print, cut, fold and package my own greeting cards. I combine my calligraphy with either my paste papers or marbling or watercolors to create my cards.

Three of my greeting cards.

Three of my greeting cards.

I scan both my calligraphy and my painting and combine them in Photoshop. I then print them on my Epson 3000 printer which uses archival ink. I print my cards on 8 1/2″ by 11″ paper, score and fold the paper, then cut it to 5″ by 7″ with my trusty Olfa hand cutter.

I print my cards on letter sized card stock. Here are a few of the ones I printed this week.

I print my cards on letter sized card stock. Here are a few of the ones I printed this week.

It is somewhat labor intensive, but it allows me to make just the amount of cards I want. I only sell my cards in my own studio, so this works for me.

Framable calligraphy card - the heart never gets wrinkles

Framable calligraphy card – the heart never gets wrinkles

My cards are designed so that they look great when put in a 5″ by 7″ mat or frame. That’s why I call them Framables.

Enjoy, Candy

Paste Paper Envelopes & Gold Brush Pen

I really enjoy Jean Wilson’s blog, Pushing The Envelopes. Jean is a fellow calligrapher who is an avid mail art enthusiast. She regularly hosts mail art envelope exchanges. This is what I send out for September’s exchange.

Envelopes made from paste papers in autumn colors. Gold brush pen on bottom right.

Envelopes made from paste papers in autumn colors. Gold brush pen (bottom right) was used to write the names on envelopes.

I made my envelopes out of autumn colors of paste papers I made in August. After cutting and folding my envelopes, I used my new Kuretake Gold Metallic Brush Pen. I purchased it from Paper and Ink Arts last spring, but had never gotten around to trying it. Now that I have, I’ll be using is a lot more. I love it!

Paste paper envelopes with names and stamps. One of the envelopes goes to France and one to Australia.

Paste paper envelopes with names and stamps. One of the envelopes goes to France and one to Australia.

I really am going to have to play with different colors of backgrounds for my gold brush. It’s obvious that it shows up better on some backgrounds than others. I love trying new tools and this one is obviously a keeper.
Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – New Earth Spirit Vessel, Dreamscape

This past week I’ve been finishing up my latest Earth Spirit Vessel, Dreamscape. The first paste papers I made this summer were for Dreamscape. They are various shades of purple along with some gold.

Earth Spirit Vessel, Dreamscape

Earth Spirit Vessel, Dreamscape

I love the combination of the purples with black, dramatic, powerful and beautiful. As I was putting the pieces together, the name Dreamscape popped into my mind. I think it’s perfect for this Earth Spirit Vessel.

Enjoy, Candy

Paste Paper Recipes

Last month (and now continuing into this month) I’ve been making paste papers, lots and lots of paste papers. Those of you who follow my blog know what I’m talking about, but for others, here’s a link to find out more about what paste papers are: Making Paste Papers – Part One.

Some of my paste papers.

Some of my paste papers.

This year I decided to try out a number of different paste paper recipes. It was interesting to see how different recipes changed how the paste worked. While my favorite recipe is still my archival cooked paste, I have found others that work almost as well. I’m sharing the results here.

Some of the triangle boxes stacked.

Some of the triangle boxes. There’s a lot you can make with paste papers.

Wall Paper Paste Recipe
The easiest “recipe” is to purchase premixed wall paper paste from Home Depot. Add color to the paste, then paint and decorate the wet or damp paper. I used Golden Liquid Acrylics, but anything that would color the paste would work.

What I liked. The paste is premixed and doesn’t need straining. The paste doesn’t need to be refrigerated and keeps almost forever. There’s very little prep work needed. The finished paste paper is not likely to crack. The finished paper will not attract bugs.

What I didn’t like. Because a lot of the work is already done for you, it does cost more money than most other pastes. I had no control over the consistency as it was premixed. I found the paste to be just a little thinner than I like. When the paste dried it was a bit dull.

Flour & Water Recipe
Flour and water is another possible paste that can be easily made. If you add non-toxic tempera paints, this is a very inexpensive paste that can be used with young children.

3 cups water
1/2 cup flour
Add just enough of the water to the flour to make a paste the consistency of cream. Boil the rest of the water, then add the flour and water mixture. Simmer for 10 minutes, stirring constantly. Remove from the heat. Strain through a strainer or cheesecloth to remove any lumps. Let the paste cool before using.

What I liked. The ingredients are easy to find. It’s easy to make and it’s non-toxic.

What I didn’t like. Bugs tend to like the dried flour. It’s not archival. Cooking takes time. If I’m going to this much trouble to cook paste, I would want to make my archival recipe. The paste needs to be used in a few days or it goes bad.

Cornstarch Recipe
Another recipe that uses ingredients you’re likely to already have on hand. Although it’s not my favorite, many paste paper artists like this recipe.

1/4 cup cornstarch
1 3/4 cups water
Mix cornstarch with 1/4 cup cold water. Add 1 cup water and heat on medium high. Stir constantly until mixture resembles a thick custard. Remove from heat and add the remaining 1/2 cup water. Mix once, then let sit to cool thoroughly. After cool, strain paste through strainer or cheesecloth.

What I liked. This only calls for cornstarch and water, something I always have in my kitchen.

What I didn’t like. I find the paste papers made with this to be a bit dull. The paste needs to be used in a few days or it goes bad.

Methyl Cellulose Recipe
This is the hardest recipe to explain as the quantities of water to powder change depending on where you get your methyl cellulose. While Daniel Smith no longer sells it, I used about half as much of their methyl cellulose to get the same consistency as I got using the methyl cellulose I got from John Neal Bookseller. However, John Neal’s methyl cellulose mixed much easier than Daniel Smith’s. So, my best suggestion is to mix it as suggested by whoever you get your methyl cellulose from.

What I liked. Once mixed, it lasts indefinitely (use distilled water and glass or plastic containers, no metal). It’s almost like working with watercolors. Great top coat when adding another color on a different type of paste paper. Archival.

What I didn’t like. It takes a while to find the right water/methyl cellulose balance. It’s almost like working with watercolors and gives a soft edge. Some paste paper artists use about 50% methyl cellulose and 50% acrylic. It is very expensive, in my opinion to use this much acrylic paint. I use about 1 teaspoon of acrylic to 1/2 cup of paint (though I never actually measure).

Non-Cook Wheat Starch Paste Recipe
This powder is somehow precooked. It is mixed with cold water and requires no cooking. You can order it from John Neal Bookseller and probably other places.

4 tablespoons non-cook wheat starch
2 cups cold water
Add 4 tablespoons non-cook wheat starch paste to 2 cups cold water. Stir until mixed. Strain paste through strainer or cheesecloth.

What I liked. It’s easy to make. No cooling time required. It’s easy to control the thickness.

What I didn’t like. I can only get the non-cook wheat starch online. The paste needs to be used in a few days or it goes bad.

My Archival Wheat Starch & Rice Flour Recipe
This is my favorite recipe. I’ve been using it for years and I know just what to expect from it.

4 tablespoons wheat starch
3 tablespoons rice flour
3 cups boiling distilled water
1 teaspoon tincture of green soap
1/2 teaspoon glycerine
optional – several drops of oil of cloves as a preservative
Mix wheat starch and rice flour with just enough cool distilled water to for a mixture the consistency of heavy cream. Let sit for 30 minutes. Add 1 cup boiling water to starch and flour mixture. Place in double boiler (already hot), stir and add another cup boiling water almost immediately. Stir constantly. Cook for about 5 minutes. Add another cup boiling water and cook about another 5 minutes, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Add glycerine and soap. Mix well, but don’t beat (you don’t want to introduce air bubbles). After cool, strain paste through strainer or cheesecloth.

What I liked. I like the texture of this paste on the paper. It’s archival. The colors are brighter than with some other pastes. The paste holds patterns well.

What I didn’t like. Sometimes I’d rather have a smoother surface, but that’s what other recipes are for. Ingredients are hard to find. I have to order the wheat starch online. I get the glycerine from my local pharmacy. I order the tincture of green soap from my local pharmacy. The paste needs to be used in a few days or it goes bad.

I love the various colors of purple and gold that will eventually find their way into an Earth Spirit Vessel.

Purple and gold paste papers that will eventually find their way into an Earth Spirit Vessel.

My Suggestions
If cost is your #1 concern, go with the Flour and Water Recipe or the Cornstarch Recipe.

If you want super easy, use Home Depot’s wall paper paste.

If you want the most archival, go with either the Methyl Cellulose Recipe or My Archival Wheat Starch & Rice Flour Recipe.

My suggestion for the best combination of ease and quality, I would suggest the Non-Cook Wheat Starch Recipe. To make it a bit more archival and flexible, add 1/4 teaspoon of glycerine and 1/2 teaspoon of liquid dish soap (or tincture of green soap if you can get it).

Some of my paste papers.

More of my paste papers.

For adding color to your paste, I use Golden Liquid Acrylics. I use about 1 teaspoon of acrylic to about 1/2 cup paste. I don’t measure, so it’s just approximate. I like Golden because their acrylics are heavily pigmented. You may need more of other acrylics or other paints (like tempera) to get the same color saturation. Experiment. You can use anything that will color paints.

If you are using this with children and you want to make sure everything is non-toxic, I would suggest trying Natural Earth Paints. They are made by Leah, a friend of mine. Check out her Children’s Earth Paint Kit.

Enjoy, Candy

 

Paste Paper Tools

I thought you might enjoy seeing some of the tools I use to make my paste papers. I included a photo of a paste paper along with the tool I used to make the design.

This tool is a favorite of many. I found it years ago in the paint section of a local paint store.

This tool is a favorite of many. I found it years ago in the paint section of a local paint store.

If you are new to paste papers, you can find out more information about them on these links to some of my previous blog posts.
Making Paste Papers – Part One
Making Paste Papers – Part Two

Yes, this is a toilet paper roll. It makes nice marks, especially as it gets used more and more.

Yes, this is a toilet paper roll. It makes nice marks, especially as it gets used more and more.

As you can see, you can make some very nice paste papers using things that are sitting around your house right now. You may, however, want to finish using your toilet paper before using the core as a paste paper tool.

You can find this rubber tool in many art supply shops.

You can find this rubber tool in many art supply shops.

Adding a second or third color using an old paintbrush can make an interesting paste paper.

Adding a second or third color using an old paintbrush can make an interesting paste paper. This is an inexpensive brush. I think I paid $1 for it.

This tool is cut from a piece of packaging insulation. Just about anything that will make a mark can be used.

This tool is cut from a piece of packaging insulation. Just about anything that will make a mark can be used.

This is a foam stamp. I found this in the children's toy section of a variety store.

This is a foam stamp. I found this in the children’s toy section of a variety store.

This is another stamp that was in the same package as the stamp in the photo above.

This is another stamp that was in the same package as the stamp in the previous photo.

This tool can be used 3 ways. I found it years ago in a paint store along with the tool in the first photo in this blog post.

This tool can be used 3 ways. I found it years ago in a paint store along with the tool in the first photo in this blog post.

I believe I got this tool from the University of Oregon Bookstore a year or two ago.

I believe I got this tool from the University of Oregon Bookstore a year or two ago.

I've had this for years. I think it is a comb for women's hair.

I’ve had this for years. I think it is a comb for women’s hair.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Start Of A Newly Commissioned Vessel

I just received a commission for a new type of vessel. Up until now I’ve been making Earth Spirit Vessels. Now a friend wants me to make a vessel to celebrate the marriage of a couple of her friends. I love the idea, but what should I call this new type of vessel?

Combining the colors blue, teal and silver for paste papers for a newly commissioned vessel.

Combining the colors blue, teal and silver for paste papers for a newly commissioned vessel.

Is it a Matrimonial Spirit Vessel or a Commitment Spirit Vessel or is there a better name for this new type of vessel? The colors chosen are blue, teal and silver. The next decision is what color or colors to combine with the paste paper. I’m thinking of a white or off white.

This is what I've been working on this past week, making, cutting & folding paste paper for a new vessel.

This is what I’ve been working on this past week, making, cutting & folding paste paper for a new vessel.

So, I’m looking for a name for this type of Spirit Vessel. It will still have calligraphy quotes and words inside some of the folded pieces. I will be receiving them tomorrow. Please weigh in on whether you think it should be called a Matrimonial Spirit Vessel or a Commitment Spirit Vessel or some other name.

Many thanks, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Paste Paper Boxes

My neighborhood is sponsoring a Holiday Arts, Crafts & Collectibles Sale the Saturday before Thanksgiving. The profits from this sale will be donated to our Community Art Fund for art for our community.

Three of the boxes I'm donating to our Holiday Arts, Crafts & Collectibles Sale.

Three of the boxes I’m donating to our Holiday Arts, Crafts & Collectibles Sale.

One of my contributions to this sale are these boxes that I have been making this past week. These were originally flat white boxes that were leftovers and donated by two different people. I took the flat white boxes and applied colored paste that I use to make my paste papers. You can see the wonderful results once they are folded into boxes.

Three more of the boxes I'm donating to our Holiday Arts, Crafts & Collectibles Sale.

Three more of the boxes I’m donating to our Holiday Arts, Crafts & Collectibles Sale.

You cannot purchase these boxes. You will only be able to get them if you spend a certain amount of money at our Holiday Sale.

This is how the boxes started out, flat. You can see the four colors of paste I'm using for this box.

This is how the boxes started out, flat. You can see the four colors of paste I’m using for this box.

I love being able to use boxes that were destined to be put in the recycle bin and make them into something to be treasured. Hopefully they will be used many times to exchange gifts.

The box on the lower left was the box from the photo above this one.

The box on the lower left is the same box from the photo above this one. It’s so much better looking once it’s colored.

I made a lot of these paste paper boxes this past week in my studio. Actually, for this month, my studio is my garage. I do tend get messy throwing colored paint around, so my garage is the perfect space for making paste papers.

I have added gold pigment to most of my paste paper boxes. I love how it jumps out on these purple boxes.

I have added gold pigment to most of my paste paper boxes. I love how it jumps out on these purple boxes

I will be sharing other items I’m making for the Holiday Arts, Crafts & Collectibles Sale in future blog posts.

Three more of the boxes I'm donating to our Holiday Arts, Crafts & Collectibles Sale.

Three more of the boxes I’m donating to our Holiday Arts, Crafts & Collectibles Sale.

Enjoy, Candy

 

Studio Snapshot – Back Making More Paste Papers

My burn is healing and I’m back making my paste papers. It looks as though I’ll be making my paste papers well into September.  I want to have enough paste papers to last me until next summer.

I have cut purple paste papers into 2" by 4" rectangles and am folding them into units that will eventually become one of my Earth Spirit Vessels.

I have cut purple paste papers into 2″ by 4″ rectangles and am folding them into units that will eventually become one of my Earth Spirit Vessels.

What’s new this year is that I need to make a lot more paste papers to incorporate into my Earth Spirit Vessels. The vessels I made last year were quite popular, so I will be making more this year.

I love the various colors of purple and gold that will eventually find their way into an Earth Spirit Vessel.

I love the various colors of purple and gold that will eventually find their way into an Earth Spirit Vessel.

This is what has been happening in my studio this past week. With my burn, I’ve been cutting and folding more than making paste papers. But, I’ve now healed enough to start making more paste papers again.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshop – Children Making Paste Papers

As part of my First Friday Art Walk demonstration this past Friday, I invited children to make their own paste papers. First I demonstrated how I make my paste paper, then with the permission of a parent, I let the children make their very own paste paper.

Miles chose blue, green and yellow for his paste paper.

Miles chose blue, green and yellow for his paste paper.

I had an assistant on hand to dry the paste papers with a hair dryer so the children could take their paste paper home with them. Needless to say, it was a great success.

Miles using tools to make marks in his paste.

Miles using tools to make marks in his paste.

Moving my paste paper set from my garage to my studio at the Art Center takes a huge amount of time. I figure it takes me 3 days to prepare, set it up and then take it down afterwards.

Miles has used stamps and graining tools to make marks in his paste paper. He's almost finished in this photo.

Miles has used stamps and graining tools to make marks in his paste paper. He’s almost finished in this photo.

Watching the children make their very own paste papers was so worth the effort of setting up for this project. They were all so proud of their masterpieces. They kept coming back to check on how the drying was going on.

Mari chose pink, purple, blue and teal as her colors.

Mari chose pink, purple, blue and teal as her colors.

It’s not necessary to use the high quality materials I use if you are making paste paper with children. Your paste can be flour and water and your coloring can be tempera or food coloring. You can use just about anything to color your paste.

Here Mari is using a comb to add lines to her paste paper.

Here Mari is using a comb to add lines to her paste paper.

If you are looking for some high quality non-toxic children’s paints, check out my friend, Leah’s, Natural Earth Paints. Leah has created a line of paints that are non-toxic, from paints for children to paints for professional artists.

Mari's finished paste paper.

Mari’s finished paste paper.

This is not the first time I had children make paste papers in my studio at the Ashland Art Center. I did this a couple of years ago too. It was a huge hit then too.

Remy's colors were pink, purple and teal.

Remy chose pink, purple and teal for her paste paper.

Remy starting to make marks in her paste.

Remy making marks in her paste.

Remy's finished paste paper.

Remy’s finished paste paper.

Scarlett chose teal, blue, magenta and purple as her paste colors.

Scarlett chose teal, blue, magenta and purple as her paste colors.

 

Scarlett is about to make marks in her paste.

Scarlett is about to make marks in her paste.

Scarlett is stamping patterns in her colored paste.

Scarlett is stamping patterns in her colored paste.

Samara chose magenta, purple and blue as her paste colors.

Samara chose magenta, purple and blue as her paste colors.

Samara adding texture to her paste paper.

Samara adding texture to her paste paper.

Samara is just about done with her paste paper here.

Samara is just about done with her paste paper here.

Drake was a two fisted painter, chose yellow, teal and green as his paste colors.

Drake was a two fisted painter, chose yellow, teal and green as his paste colors.

Drake was my only 2-fisted painter. He was a delight to watch.

Drake was my only 2-fisted painter. He was a delight to watch.

In addition to using both hands, Drake really slathered his paste on the paper. It took a little longer to dry, but he sure got into the process.

In addition to using both hands, Drake really slathered his paste on the paper. It took a little longer to dry, but he sure got into the process.

 

Emelia chose purple, blue, magenta and pink for her paste colors.

Emelia chose purple, blue, magenta and pink for her paste colors.

Emelia painting  her paste paper.

Emelia painting her paste paper.

Emelia's finished paste paper.

Emelia’s finished paste paper.

Owen chose yellow, blue, teal and green as his colors.

Owen chose yellow, blue, teal and green as his colors.

Owen is making marks in his paste paper.

Owen is making marks in his paste paper.

Owen has almost finished his paste paper.

Owen has almost finished his paste paper.

The kids had a great time and I loved watching them. Here are some links if you are interested in additional information.

For non-toxic paints for children:
Natural Earth Paints

For more information on paste papers:
Making Paste Papers: Part One
Making Paste Papers: Part Two

To see the paste papers children made a few years ago:
Children Making Paste Papers

Enjoy, Candy