Category Archives: Uncategorized

Studio Snapshot – Mail Received

I’ve been home for just over a week and the only paper I’ve been involved with is going through two months worth of mail and working on my and my dad’s taxes. Not the kind of paperwork I enjoy, but it needs to be done.

Mail I received while I was traveling for two months. Opening it will be my reward for finishing my dad’s and my taxes.

As an incentive to make sure I get it all done quickly, I’ve not allowed myself to open all the lovely mail art I received while I was traveling. I keep looking wistfully at all the wonderful envelopes and it does help me keep focused on getting the drudgery of paper work done. Actually, I’m almost finished. I’m thinking I will get to finally open my mail tomorrow or Friday.

I also received in the mail yesterday the supply kit for the online class: Paper Illuminated that I’m taking from Helen Hiebert. There’s still time to register for that. It starts March 8. See: Paper Illuminated Online Class for details.

Enjoy, Candy

DIY Torn Paper Santa Holiday Cards

My Christmas cards this year are a graphic image of Santa made from cut and torn pieces of red, white and tan paper. These are easy to make and would be a fun project to do with children.

My torn paper Santa Christmas cards are waiting to be mailed.

My torn paper Santa Christmas cards are waiting to be mailed.

Materials: I used red paper, beige paper and white paper. For the torn white paper, I tried both a printmaking paper  (unknown brand from my stash) and 80# Strathmore Aquarius watercolor paper. Both worked well, but I really liked how the soft printmaking paper tore. For my adhesive I used double sided tape, but glue stick would work well. You want an adhesive that isn’t very wet because that would wrinkle the paper. I also used a black marker, a light brown marker and blush makeup. In lieu of blush makeup, a crayon or pastel or chalk would work, possibly a marker.

My torn paper Santa cards look more difficult to make than they are.

My torn paper Santa cards look more difficult to make than they are.

Instructions for 5″ by 7″ card:

  1. I used red paper, beige paper and white printmaking paper (light weight watercolor paper would work well too). Text weights are fine for the red and beige papers.
  2. Cut red paper 5″ wide and about 2.5″ high and paste it on the top of the card (I used double stick tape, but glue stick would work as well).
  3. Cut beige paper 5″ wide and about 2.5″ high and paste under the red paper.
  4. Tear a white paper and paste it between the red and beige paper.
  5. For the beard, tear a piece of white paper that is 5″ wide and play around with making it look like a beard. When you are happy with the way it looks, trim the bottom of the paper to where the bottom of the card will be and glue to the card.
  6. Decorate your Santa. Black pen for eyes and mouth. Colored pen for nose. Makeup blush for the cheeks, or use a crayon or marker.
My torn paper Santa Christmas Card.

My torn paper Santa Christmas Card.

Next step is to write messages and address the envelopes.

Enjoy, Candy

DIY Holiday Origami Envelopes

Today I thought I would share some Christmas envelopes I made for my friend Margie. She had seen the ones I made earlier this year and wanted some made from Christmas wrapping paper.

The papers for these origami envelopes are from a holiday gift paper sample book.

The papers for these origami envelopes are from a holiday gift paper sample book.

Back in April, during National Letter Writing Month, I made a number of these envelopes using scanned images of my paste papers. I then found I could make them the perfect size for gift cards (the perfect gift for new grads).

Close up of some holiday origami envelopes made from gift wrap sample paper.

Close up of some holiday origami envelopes made from gift wrap sample paper.

Now, using wrapping paper from sample books that were given to me, I made a bunch of holiday origami envelopes.

HINT: It is best to work with quality wrapping paper, not the cheap variety. I found this out the hard way. I started with some cheap wrapping paper a friend gave me, but I didn’t like the way it folded. Luckily my friends at Nimbus, a local Ashland gallery, gifted me some samples of wrapping paper at just the right time. So, get a heavier weight quality wrapping paper to get the best results.

Close up of some holiday origami envelopes made from gift wrap sample paper.

Close up of some holiday origami envelopes made from gift wrap sample paper.

You can find links to the instructions to make these envelopes on my blog post: DIY Origami Envelope.
And to check out how to make them the size for gift cards, you can see my blog post: DIY Gift Card Origami Envelope.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Back Making More Paste Papers

My burn is healing and I’m back making my paste papers. It looks as though I’ll be making my paste papers well into September.  I want to have enough paste papers to last me until next summer.

I have cut purple paste papers into 2" by 4" rectangles and am folding them into units that will eventually become one of my Earth Spirit Vessels.

I have cut purple paste papers into 2″ by 4″ rectangles and am folding them into units that will eventually become one of my Earth Spirit Vessels.

What’s new this year is that I need to make a lot more paste papers to incorporate into my Earth Spirit Vessels. The vessels I made last year were quite popular, so I will be making more this year.

I love the various colors of purple and gold that will eventually find their way into an Earth Spirit Vessel.

I love the various colors of purple and gold that will eventually find their way into an Earth Spirit Vessel.

This is what has been happening in my studio this past week. With my burn, I’ve been cutting and folding more than making paste papers. But, I’ve now healed enough to start making more paste papers again.

Enjoy, Candy

DIY & Easy Heart Wreathes & Garlands

Heart wreath made from 1" by 8 1/2" strips of paper.

Heart wreath made from 1-inch by 8 1/2-inch strips of paper.

Today I thought I would share some very easy heart decorations that anyone, including children, can make. Quick and simple, but brimming with potential, these wreaths and garlands can make decorating for Valentine’s Day a snap. I like them because parents and children can turn this into a fun family project to do together.

Three hearts made from double sided paper. Each heart was from a piece of paper 1" by 8 1/2"

Three hearts made from double sided card stock. Each heart was from a piece of paper 1-inch by 8 1/2-inches.

To make the basic heart shape, I started with strips of paper 1-inch by 8 1/2-inches and folded them in half, lengthwise.

Then, still folded, I applied a bit of glue stick to the very tops of the strips (on the outside), glueing about the top 1/4-inch or 1/2-inch.

Bending the freshly glued tops of the strips down and in toward the center fold, the glued sides end up facing each other. Then I pushed them together until the glue set (or hold in place with a paper clip).

It’s a little difficult to put into words, so check out the photo above.

Here the hearts are glued together to form an arc.

Here the hearts are glued together to form an arc.

Once the hearts were made, I put a bit of glue on the side and held the hearts together with plastic-coated paper clips in a wreath shape until the glue dried.

Here the hearts are glued together to form a wreath. Just add a ribbon and hang.

Here the hearts are glued together to form a wreath. Just add a ribbon and hang.

I used glue stick, but if you really want to go fast, you can use a stapler. You get the same heart result, but the staples are visible. I prefer a glue stick, but it does take a little longer.

These heart garlands are made from text weight paper rather than the card stock of the wreathes.

These heart garlands are made from text weight paper rather than the card stock used for the wreaths.

Next, I decided to use some of my strips of paper to make a garland of hearts. I used text weight paper, not the stiffer paper needed to keep the wreaths in shape. Here, I poked the bottom of one heart into the top of the next heart and glued them together to make my garland. If you are NOT stapling, then you will need to glue the bottom (where you make the fold) about 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch to get the same result.

Hot pink and purple heart garlands.

Hot pink and purple heart garlands.

Red and white heart garland made with strips of paper 1/2" x 6"

Red and white heart garland made with strips of paper 1/2-inch by 6-inches.

I decided to vary the length and width of the paper strips for my garlands. The red and white garland above was made with strips that are 1/2-inch by 6-inches. Feel free to play around with different widths and lengths of paper and see which results you like best. Or maybe you’ll find that you like having a variety of garland sizes. You can even mix lengths in the same garland if you want different size hearts.

You can just pile the hearts together to make an interesting table decoration or display.

You can even pile the hearts together to make an interesting table decoration or display.

There are many different variations on these wreathes and garlands. Play around and see what you come up with.

Happy creating, Candy

Children Making Paste Paper

Here Sam is using a comb to make marks on her paste paper.

A young girl, Sam, making her very first paste paper. 

Last week, during Ashland’s monthly First Friday Art Walk, I set up an area in my studio for children to learn how to make their own paste paper. First I demonstrated, then I opened up the area for the children to do their own thing. It was so fun to watch them. They were fearless as they brushed the colored paste on the paper. Here are some photos of their fun.

This is how Sam started her paste paper.

The very beginning of Sam’s paste paper.

Here Sam is making her final stroke with the comb. I got out the hair dryer, dried her paper and she got to take it home with her.

Here, Sam is making her final stroke with the comb. I plugged in the hair dryer to dry her paper so she could take her paste paper home with her.

This is how Aidan started his paste paper.

This is how Aidan started his paste paper.

Aidan adding more color.

Aidan adding more color.

Here is Aidan's final piece. Notice the stamp in the middle.

Here is Aidan’s final piece. Notice the stamp in the middle.

Here Lottie is starting her paste paper.

Here Lottie is starting her paste paper.

Here Lottie is using a comb on her paste paper. The comb was very popular. I had lots of tools for making marks on the paper, but the variegated comb was the one most of the children wanted to use.

Here, Lottie is using a comb on her paste paper. The comb was very popular. I had lots of tools available for making marks on the paper, but the variegated comb was the one most of the children wanted to use.

This is how Beckett started her paste paper.

This is how Beckett started her paste paper.

Here Beckett is making her final stroke. She, too, is using the variegated comb.

Here, Beckett is making her final stroke. She too is using the variegated comb.

Her is how Olivia started her paste paper.

Here is how Olivia started her paste paper.

Olivia is just finishing her paste paper.

Olivia is just finishing her paste paper.

This is Gigi's paste paper.

This is Gigi’s paste paper.

The children had a great time. At the end of it all, they got to take their paste papers home with them, too. I loved having the kids play in my studio, even if they did make a little more of a mess than I usually do.

Enjoy, Candy

P.S.
For more information about paste papers, what they are, and how I make them, check out my blog posts on making paste paper:
Making Paste Paper: Part One
Making Paste Paper: Part Two

A Gift: The Beautiful Blogger Award

I’ve been gifted the Beautiful Blogger Award!!! I am so honored!

I give a big thank you to blogger From Brain to Brush for nominating my blog for this award. From Brain to Brush is a visual art blog for lovers of art and art educators. It is a wonderful blog and a must for anyone who makes art with children.

Rules for Nominees:

1. Thank the person who nominated you

Thank you From Brain to Brush

2. Post the award image to your page

3. Tell 7 facts about yourself

Creativity is my 1st language, English is my second

I enjoy forests more than beaches

I try for simplicity, though she often eludes me

I learn a lot about myself through journaling

My two sons taught me a lot about multi-tasking

I think of my art as play and as life therapy

My mountain bike has actually been on mountains

4. Nominate 15 other bloggers, and let them know about the nomination.

Here I have included blogs of friends, blogs that I follow and a couple of new blogs just keep it all fresh.

          Elaine Frenett – Elaine is an amazing watercolorist. This blog looks at her journal pages. She teaches watercolor and journaling workshops.

          Leah Fanning Mebane – Leah paints with non-toxic oil paints that she makes herself. She also has a line of non-toxic watercolor and oil paints called Earth Paints.

          Sarah F. Burns – Sarah tries to catch the spark of life in her paintings and drawings that elicit feelings of empathy for the complicated and simple and beautiful and sad and interesting world of humankind. 

          Silvia Trujillo – On her blog, Silvia’s Studio, Silvia highlights her latest paintings.

          JoAnn Manzone – Dreamweaving Designs – JoAnn is a felt maker extraordinaire. She also teaches classes.

          Rachel Austin – Paper and PlanesThis is an absolutely delightful blog. I especially like the How To Paint Like A Kid post.

          Alisa Burke – Alisa is an incredible artist. She has online classes and has retreats at her studio in Seaside, Oregon.

          Luann Udall – I have admired Luann’s art for years. It’s hard to describe, but it reminds me of old artifacts.

          Bonnie Christine – Going Home to Roust – Bonnie is a blogger extraordinaire. She blogs about things that are handmade and homegrown.

         Justine – Upon A Fold – This is the most incredible blog about folded paper that I have ever seen. Even if you are not a paper fanatic, this is a must to see.

         Cookus Interruptus – This is a blog about how to cook fresh local organic whole foods despite life’s interruptions.

          Paula Beardell – Playful Bookbinding and Paper Works I love that this blog combines playfulness with instruction and wonderful photos.

          Elissa Campbell – Blue Roof Designs – Elissa makes handmade journals, photo albums and guest books. Be sure to check out the video of a 4 year old making a 10 signature book!

          The Milkman Goes To College – This blog has great drawing exercises.

          Ginger Burrell – Midnight Musings – Ginger is a wonderful bookbinder. In her blog you can read about how she built her new studio.

 

Illuminated Paper Sculptures Workshop

The shadow box can be closed with a candle or other light to illuminate it from inside.

I just got back from two incredible weeks of making art, sort of a working vacation involving playing with paper, lamps, calligraphy, bookbinding and so much more. During the first week of my vacation, I took a workshop, Illuminated Paper Sculpture, from Helen Hiebert. Helen makes paper and also makes the most incredible paper sculptures and lamps. You can see her Mother Tree Project along with links to more of her art on her website: http://www.helenhiebertstudio.com

Here is one of the projects I made during the workshop. This shadow box can be closed to make a lamp shade structure or opened to make a screen. It looks great with a light shining through.

Here the screen is open with a light shining from behind.

My problem now is that there are only 24 hours in each day. I want to play with so many of the structures I learned in the workshop and at the calligraphy and bookbinding retreat I attended last week. After being gone for two weeks, unfortunately, there are other things that I need to attend to before I can just play with my art again. I hope to be caught up by this weekend so I can spend more time in my studio next week.

Enjoy, Candy