Tag Archives: childrens crafts

Dorothy’s Dinky Doodles

Last year, before my friend Dorothy moved, she gave me a couple sheets of one of her Dinky Doodles. I’m not sure if they’re laser or ink jet copies, but I absolutely love them! I put them away and forgot about them until I was going through the paper piles in my studio closet this past week.

I was able to make all these little boxes from the two papers of Dinky Doodles that Dorothy gave me.

I was able to make all these little boxes from the two papers of Dinky Doodles that Dorothy gave me.

I decided it was time for me to do something with these doodles that Dorothy gave me. The papers were light weight copy paper, so I decided folded little paper boxes would look great out of these papers.

These were the two Dinky Doodles that Dorothy gave to me. They are copies of doodles that she makes.

These were the two Dinky Doodle papers that Dorothy gave to me. They are copies of doodles that she makes.

I folded the tops of the boxes out of Dorothy’s paper and made the bottoms of the boxes out of colorful coordinating papers.

Little folded boxes made from Dorothy's Dinky Doodle paper.

Little folded boxes made from Dorothy’s Dinky Doodle papers.

Dorothy paints what she calls Dinky Doodles on papers. It’s fun and easy for anyone to do. Then she copies her doodles. This would be a perfect project to do with children. It would work well with crayons or watercolors or markers.

Little boxes made from Dorothy's painted papers she calls Dinky Doodles.

Little boxes made from Dorothy’s painted papers she calls Dinky Doodles.

Enjoy, Candy

 

Ladybug Cards & Mobile

In just two weeks, I will be opening my home studio to the public during the Ashland Gallery Association Open Studio Tour. It’ll be the first time I’ve opened my home studio for viewing and it’s a little scary for me. I decided to include a number of demonstrations of my more popular blog projects. That includes my ladybug cards and ladybug mobile.

Ladybug cards.

Ladybug cards.

I designed my ladybug cards last summer. They can easily be glued to a card or glued back to back on a string to make a mobile. I’m sure there are many more ways these wonderful ladybugs can be used.

Ladybug card and ladybug mobile in progress.

Ladybug card with ladybug mobile in progress.

The ladybugs themselves are made from a square of red paper. When added to the card, they make a wonderful 3-D effect. And when glued to the string of the mobile, they move wonderfully when there is any breeze or other movement around them.

Ladybug card with ladybug mobile in progress.

Ladybug card with ladybug mobile in progress.

Instructions for making these ladybugs are on my blog post: DIY Ladybug Card. You can also see more photos of my ladybug garland on my blog post: Paper Ladybug Garlands.

Enjoy, Candy

DIY – From Blobs To Birds

I was testing out some watercolor combinations and ended up with a number of splotches and blobs on my paper. A little playing with these and I ended up with some cute little birds.

Two little birds made from watercolor blobs.

Two little birds made from watercolor blobs. Mother and son?

It’s really simple. Make some somewhat circular watercolor blobs on a paper. Outline the blobs with a waterproof marker. Then add details like dots for eyes, squiggles for the tail, a triangle for a beak, lines for the legs and feet, and possibly a wing.

These little birds are so easy to make. Just a watercolor blob and a few lines.

These little birds are so easy to make. Just a watercolor blob and a few lines.

These are so cute. They can be added to envelopes, place cards, journal pages and so much more. I think these would make a great children’s activity.

A page from my sketchbook showing a few birds made from blobs of watercolors.

A page from my sketchbook showing a few birds made from blobs of watercolors.

I am pretty sure I saw something like this somewhere, but I can’t remember where, probably on the internet. It might have been done with fingerprints. Anyway, play around with this and come up with your own playful little birds.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshop – Children Making Paste Papers

As part of my First Friday Art Walk demonstration this past Friday, I invited children to make their own paste papers. First I demonstrated how I make my paste paper, then with the permission of a parent, I let the children make their very own paste paper.

Miles chose blue, green and yellow for his paste paper.

Miles chose blue, green and yellow for his paste paper.

I had an assistant on hand to dry the paste papers with a hair dryer so the children could take their paste paper home with them. Needless to say, it was a great success.

Miles using tools to make marks in his paste.

Miles using tools to make marks in his paste.

Moving my paste paper set from my garage to my studio at the Art Center takes a huge amount of time. I figure it takes me 3 days to prepare, set it up and then take it down afterwards.

Miles has used stamps and graining tools to make marks in his paste paper. He's almost finished in this photo.

Miles has used stamps and graining tools to make marks in his paste paper. He’s almost finished in this photo.

Watching the children make their very own paste papers was so worth the effort of setting up for this project. They were all so proud of their masterpieces. They kept coming back to check on how the drying was going on.

Mari chose pink, purple, blue and teal as her colors.

Mari chose pink, purple, blue and teal as her colors.

It’s not necessary to use the high quality materials I use if you are making paste paper with children. Your paste can be flour and water and your coloring can be tempera or food coloring. You can use just about anything to color your paste.

Here Mari is using a comb to add lines to her paste paper.

Here Mari is using a comb to add lines to her paste paper.

If you are looking for some high quality non-toxic children’s paints, check out my friend, Leah’s, Natural Earth Paints. Leah has created a line of paints that are non-toxic, from paints for children to paints for professional artists.

Mari's finished paste paper.

Mari’s finished paste paper.

This is not the first time I had children make paste papers in my studio at the Ashland Art Center. I did this a couple of years ago too. It was a huge hit then too.

Remy's colors were pink, purple and teal.

Remy chose pink, purple and teal for her paste paper.

Remy starting to make marks in her paste.

Remy making marks in her paste.

Remy's finished paste paper.

Remy’s finished paste paper.

Scarlett chose teal, blue, magenta and purple as her paste colors.

Scarlett chose teal, blue, magenta and purple as her paste colors.

 

Scarlett is about to make marks in her paste.

Scarlett is about to make marks in her paste.

Scarlett is stamping patterns in her colored paste.

Scarlett is stamping patterns in her colored paste.

Samara chose magenta, purple and blue as her paste colors.

Samara chose magenta, purple and blue as her paste colors.

Samara adding texture to her paste paper.

Samara adding texture to her paste paper.

Samara is just about done with her paste paper here.

Samara is just about done with her paste paper here.

Drake was a two fisted painter, chose yellow, teal and green as his paste colors.

Drake was a two fisted painter, chose yellow, teal and green as his paste colors.

Drake was my only 2-fisted painter. He was a delight to watch.

Drake was my only 2-fisted painter. He was a delight to watch.

In addition to using both hands, Drake really slathered his paste on the paper. It took a little longer to dry, but he sure got into the process.

In addition to using both hands, Drake really slathered his paste on the paper. It took a little longer to dry, but he sure got into the process.

 

Emelia chose purple, blue, magenta and pink for her paste colors.

Emelia chose purple, blue, magenta and pink for her paste colors.

Emelia painting  her paste paper.

Emelia painting her paste paper.

Emelia's finished paste paper.

Emelia’s finished paste paper.

Owen chose yellow, blue, teal and green as his colors.

Owen chose yellow, blue, teal and green as his colors.

Owen is making marks in his paste paper.

Owen is making marks in his paste paper.

Owen has almost finished his paste paper.

Owen has almost finished his paste paper.

The kids had a great time and I loved watching them. Here are some links if you are interested in additional information.

For non-toxic paints for children:
Natural Earth Paints

For more information on paste papers:
Making Paste Papers: Part One
Making Paste Papers: Part Two

To see the paste papers children made a few years ago:
Children Making Paste Papers

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – What To Do With Empty Metal Tea Tins

One of my favorite teas is Double Green Matcha tea. It comes 50 bags to a tin. But what to do with the tins once the tea is gone? I’ve been drinking this tea for years, so I’ve built up quite a stash of tins. The empty tins are too good to just throw in the recycle bin.

All these started out holding tea bags, like the tea tin in the middle of the photo.

These all started out holding tea bags, like the tea tin in the middle of the photo.

First, I clean the tea tins. The paper comes off  easily, but the adhesive is a little harder to get off. I found De-Solv-it works fairly well. It sometimes takes a few applications, but I usually have a clean and sparkling tin in minutes.

Empty metal tea tins are easy to decorate for use as gift containers.

Empty metal tea tins are easy to decorate for use as gift containers.

For these tins, I printed some of my paste papers onto a light weight Japanese sketch paper. The paper muted the colors of the paste paper a bit, but I loved the look and the texture. I found that a light weight paper, and light weight oriental papers specifically, work wonderfully for this project.

Empty metal tea tins are easy to decorate for use as gift containers.

Empty metal tea tins are easy to decorate for use as gift containers.

I wrote a DIY blog post on how I wrap these tins a number of years ago (see link at bottom of this article). This technique will work for lots of different containers you may have in your kitchen. I’ve wrapped cocoa tins, spice jars, even oatmeal containers.

Empty metal tea tins are easy to decorate for use as gift containers.

Empty metal tea tins are easy to decorate for use as gift containers.

This is an easy project. It’s a perfect summer project to do with children. All you need is a container, a light weight paper and some double stick tape. It would work great to use children’s artwork as the paper wrapping too.

link to DIY – Decorative Gift Containers

Happy Creating, Candy