Tag Archives: decorated envelope

National Letter Writing Month 2017 – Week 2

I have been having a lot of fun with making envelopes and writing letters this past week. I have finally found something that works well with traveling. I still don’t quite have things as organized as I’d like, but at least I’m not losing my art supplies as I was on my last trip.

These are two of the letters and envelopes that I sent out this past week.

I love it when April rolls around each year. I seem to be way behind in my correspondence and National Card & Letter Writing Month gives me permission to drop everything else and concentrate on writing letters and making unique decorated envelopes.

I was delighted to find that there was no additional postage for the folded envelopes with the diagonal corners. Yea!

This year, I’ve been making a bunch of folded envelopes that have diagonal corners. I took some of them to the Post Office to ask just how much extra postage they would require. No extra postage. So, I’m making lots more of these envelopes. I’m including another little origami envelope in with my letter. See my blog post DIY Origami Envelope and a link to the instructions.

Two of the letters and envelopes I sent out this past week for National Card & Letter Writing Month.

I feel as though I might actually get caught up on my letter writing. Of course, with being away from home for a month and a half, I’m sure there’ll be a bunch more mail waiting for me.

Two more of the folded envelopes with diagonal corners.

I have lots of pen pals who enjoy folded paper, so I’m sending them the folded envelopes with diagonal corners. I made my envelopes from wrapping paper samples.

Two more letters and envelopes that went out this past week for National Card & Letter Writing Month.

Enjoy, Candy

DIY – Color Your Own Flower Envelope

Adult coloring books have become popular of late. So, I thought my readers might be interested in coloring their own flower envelope. I’ve done the drawing and have a template that you can print out. All you have to do is to cut out the envelope, fold it, and color it.

These are the markers and pens I used to color my flower envelope. Downloadable template is at end of this blog post.

These are the markers and pens I used to color my flower envelope. Downloadable template is at end of this blog post.

I know not everyone feels comfortable drawing, so this way you don’t have to. I drew the flower, scanned it, and placed it on on the front of the envelope. I made the template to fit on an 8.5″ by 11″ paper. It makes an A-2 size envelope, but you can size it to fit whatever paper size you can print on.

My finished envelope. Downloadable template is at end of blog post.

My finished envelope. Downloadable template is at end of this blog post.

Flower Envelope Template

Happy Coloring, Candy

Studio Snapshot – National Letter Writing Month (week 4)

I’ve been having a fun time designing matching envelopes and stationery this month. I’ve been sending out at least one letter a day in a hand decorated envelope in honor of April being National Letter Writing Month. These are the envelopes I sent out last week.

I sent Lilli this envelope and stationery for day 19 of National Letter Writing Month.

This letter and envelope went to Lilli for day 19 of National Letter Writing Month.

I sent Lilli a paste paper envelope last year, so I wanted to send her a different type of envelope this year.

This letter and envelope went to Shelly for day 20 of National Letter Writing Month.

This letter and envelope went to Shelly for day 20 of National Letter Writing Month.

Shelly (above) and Leanne (below) are participants in the Letters of Joy Envelope Exchange. I like the way both of these envelopes and matching stationery came out.

This letter and envelope went to Leanne for day 21 of National Letter Writing Month.

This letter and envelope went to Leanne for day 21 of National Letter Writing Month.

It’s been fun to exchange envelopes with others around the country and sometimes around the world. I’ve been in numerous envelope exchanges and they really are lots of fun. I’ve made a number of new pen pals and friends.

This letter and two envelopes went to Diane for day 22 of National Letter Writing Month.

This letter and two envelopes went to Diane for day 22 of National Letter Writing Month.

Diane does the most wonderful iris folding using both oriental papers and old kimono fabric. I wanted to send her an envelope that had a Japanese feel to it. So I put her letter into an origami envelope and put the envelope into a translucent envelope so you could see the detail of the paste paper and the folded origami envelope inside. I used colors to go with the wonderful cherry blossoms on the stamp. I really like the way it came together. Sometimes my ideas work the first time around.

This letter and envelope went to Eric, in France, for day 23 of National Letter Writing Month.

This letter and envelope went to Eric, in France, for day 23 of National Letter Writing Month.

I have exchanged a number of pieces of mail art with Eric over the years. He lives in France and has pen pals all over the world. He has a blog: My Mail Art World. Check it out to see lots of creative envelopes and art.

This letter and envelope went to Sharon for day 24 of National Letter Writing Month.

This letter and envelope went to Sharon for day 24 of National Letter Writing Month.

My dear friend, Sharon, used to live just down the street from me. We would get together at least once a week. She moved to Portland nearly 4 years ago and I miss her dearly. We stay in touch via phone and snail mail, and an occasional visit. I sent her letter in this envelope made from one of my paste papers.

This letter and envelope went to Susan for day 25 of National Letter Writing Month.

This letter and envelope went to Susan for day 25 of National Letter Writing Month.

I have not yet met Susan, even though we’ve been exchanging decorated envelopes and calligraphy for some time. She’s on the East Coast and I’m on the West Coast. Maybe some day we’ll manage to meet in person. Meanwhile, our mail goes back and forth across the country.

To see the envelopes I sent out in other weeks see:
National Letter Writing Month – Week 1
National Letter  Writing Month – Week 2
National Letter Writing Month – Week 3

Happy letter writing, Candy

DIY – Coordinating Stationery

I’ve been sending out letters and notes in my flower envelopes (see Flower Envelopes – The Process for how I make them). However, with all the effort I’ve gone through to make the envelopes, it seemed a shame that I didn’t have coordinating stationery to go with the envelopes. So, I decided to rectify that situation.

I used the same colors on the stripe on note paper that I used to paint the envelope and now it's coordinating stationery and not just a pretty envelope.

I used the same colors on the stripe of the note paper that I used to paint the envelope. I now have coordinating stationery, not just a pretty envelope.

I wanted something simple, yet have it match the colors and style of the envelope. I used a number of papers, both watercolor and light cover papers, papers from my stash. If I were to buy a paper, I think I’d try a quality medium weight bristol paper.

The first thing I did was to tape off the area on the paper that I wanted to paint. You can see I used blue painters tape.

The first thing I did was to tape off the area on the paper that I wanted to paint. You can see I used blue painters tape.

The envelopes I’ve been painting are A-7 envelopes and are designed to fit a card (or piece of paper) that is 5″ by 7″. So that’s the size I cut my papers. Then I used either blue painters tape (like in the photo) or transparent removable tape (not shown). I think artists tape would work better, but I don’t have any in my studio right now. I tend to work with what’s available at the moment I get my inspiration.

I painted gold over the orange, just as I did when I made my envelope.

I painted gold liquid acrylic over the orange of the Copic marker, just as I did when I made my envelope.

I taped off section of the paper a little over 1/2″ wide. Then I painted colors and or patterns that I used when making the envelope.

And while the gold paint was still wet I added the hot pink paint in some areas.

And while the gold paint was still wet I added the hot pink paint in some areas.

There was a deckle edge on some of the watercolor papers, so I taped off just the edge and painted it a coordinating color.

I painted the deckle edge on this watercolor paper the same color as the background on the envelope. I also painted a decoration that reminded me of the flower petals on the envelope.

I painted the deckle edge on this watercolor paper the same color as the background on the envelope. I also painted a decoration that reminded me of the flower petals on the envelope.

Just painting a deckle edge a coordinating color of an envelope could be just enough to make beautiful coordinating stationery. That would be simple and elegant (and a lot less work).

For the coordinating stationery here, I painted the background color of the envelope to the left of the patterned stipe. There are lots of options.

For the coordinating stationery here, I painted the background color of the envelope to the left of the patterned stipe. There are lots of options.

I didn’t match the envelope exactly. I just tried do something that had a similar feel and color so it felt like the stationery and envelope went together.

Here is another envelope where I colored the strip to the left of the patterned stripe on the coordinating notepaper.

Here is another envelope where I colored the strip to the left of the patterned stripe on the coordinating notepaper.

While I could have made a traditional notecard that’s blank inside, I decided to have just a single piece of paper. I can write my notes on one or both sides of the paper. I used a somewhat heavy paper, so the writing won’t show through the other side of the paper.

This should be titled "Pretty in Pink"

This should be titled “Pretty in Pink”

Since this flower with the black background was so dramatic, I had to come up with a design that looked dramatic too. I ended up putting a black stripe on each side of the pattern, along with gold dots that I also used on the envelope.

Since this envelope with the black background is so dramatic, I had to come up with a design that looked dramatic too. I ended up putting a black stripe on each side of the pattern, along with gold dots that I also used on the envelope.

This notecard shows how I plan on writing to my friends by writing their name in a coordinating color.

This notecard shows how I plan on writing to my friends by writing their name in a coordinating color.

This notecard has a painted deckle edge the same color as the background on the envelope.

Another example of a notecard with a painted deckle edge the same color as the background on the envelope.

Play and enjoy!

Here’s to happy letter writing, Candy

 

DIY Envelope & Letter In One

I was requested to share my instructions for making this envelope and letter in one. I posted photos of my envelopes for National Letter Writing Month on Facebook page, and was asked how I make this envelope and letter all in one. So here are the instructions.

These two envelopes, with the letter on the inside of the envelope, each made from one of my paste papers, will go in the mail today.

These two envelopes, with the letter on the inside of the envelope are made from my paste papers.

It’s easy. First take a piece of paper and fold it in almost thirds, like you were going to put it in a business envelope.

The dashed lines show where the folds go.

The dashed lines show where the folds go.

Here is how it is folded, step by step.

Fold the paper in thirds, then fold the bottom third up.

Fold the paper in thirds, unfold, then fold the bottom third up.

Fold the top corners of the page down to the fold line as shown above.

Fold the top corners of the page down to the fold line as shown above.

Now fold the top third down.

Now fold the top third down.

And secure it with a sticker or tape.

And secure it with a sticker or tape (after writing your letter on the other side).

Address the front of the envelope, put on a stamp and mail.

Address the front of the envelope, put on a stamp and mail.

Note: I took my envelopes to the post office and they suggested putting a sticker or tape on the sides (just a little bit) to make sure the envelope wouldn’t get caught when going through their automated machines.

Three envelopes made from my original paste papers designed so that the letter is on the inside of the envelope.

You might note that I spelled Carroll’s name incorrectly on the sample showing how to fold this envelope. I actually sent her the envelope above with her name spelled correctly.

Idea: Send a child’s drawing to grandparents. Have the drawing on the outside along with the address and have a little note about the drawing on the inside with the letter.

Enjoy, Candy

Envelopes Need Addresses

As you may already know, I’m sending out a letter a day for the month of April, which is National Letter Writing Month. I’ve shared two posts about it already. But, as I was recently reminded, the Post Office won’t deliver those envelopes unless they are addressed.

I sent Jan's envelope in the mail, and as you can see it was postmarked. However, it was returned to me because I forgot to put on Jan's address. OOPS!

I sent Jan’s envelope in the mail, and as you can see it was postmarked. However, it was returned to me because I forgot to put on Jan’s address. Apparently the Post Office insists on addresses on envelopes.

I sent Jan’s letter out without putting her address on it. Oops! And guess what. The Post Office was kind enough to cancel the stamp and send it back to me (the return address is on the back). I’m going to try again, but this time I’ll address it correctly.

Just a gentle reminder to those who are as absent minded as I am.

Happy National Letter Writing Month, Candy

Envelope Mail Art

This is an envelope I sent to Jean Wilson. If you are interested in mail art, check out Jeans blog pushingtheenvelopes.

This is an envelope I sent to Jean Wilson. If you are interested in mail art, check out Jeans blog pushingtheenvelopes.

I love sending and receiving mail the “old fashioned” way, in actual physical envelopes with hand written addresses. Being a calligrapher as well as an artist, and having lots of friends with similar interests, I have sent and received some very interesting envelopes. I hope the following examples spark some interest in sending some fun mail art to your friends.

(You may notice that some of the addresses appear incomplete. Aside from Jean Wilson, whose address is freely shared on her envelope blog, I felt it best to digitally remove the addresses from my images before posting them for all the world to see.)

Here is an envelope that Jean sent to me.

Here is an envelope that Jean sent to me. The “gingerbread” in the stamp is echoed in my name.

Here are the envelopes I sent out for the envelope exchange. (see photo below for how they looked before I added the addresses and stamps).

Here are the envelopes I sent out for the envelope exchange. (see photo below for how they looked before I added the addresses and stamps).

This is how the envelopes looked as I started, with just the hand hearts. I used three different watercolors and one acrylic iridescent ink.

This is how the envelopes looked as I started, with just the hand hearts. I used three different colors of watercolor and one acrylic iridescent ink.

This envelope came from Tammie in 1997. Notice the 32 cent stamp.

This envelope came from Tammie in 1997. Notice the 32 cent stamp.

This envelope and note card started out as handmade paper made and given to me by a friend. My mother did the Chinese brush painting on the front of them. I love them too much to actually use them.

This envelope and note card started out as handmade paper made and given to me by a friend. I asked my mother to do the Chinese brush painting on the front of them. I love them too much to actually use them.

This envelope came from Sandy. It's from 1995. Again, notice the 32 cent stamp.

This envelope came from Sandy. It’s from 1995. Again, notice the 32 cent stamp.

This card and envelope came from Cathy from Mississippi. She said she never uses orange, but was inspired by the stamp to try it. I think it worked out GREAT!

This card and envelope came from Cathy from Mississippi. She said she never uses orange, but was inspired by the stamp to try it. I think it worked out GREAT!

This envelope came from Susan, who is obviously a very practiced calligrapher. She wrote on the paper first, then made it into an envelope. This is another case where the stamp and envelope decoration work together to create a work of art.

This envelope came from Susan, who is obviously a very practiced calligrapher. She wrote on the paper first, then made it into an envelope. This is another case where the stamp and envelope decoration work together to create a work of art.

This colorful envelope came from Betty. I love how fresh the colors are here.

This colorful envelope came from Betty. I love how fresh the colors are here.

This envelope came from Michelle. This is her first attempt at a Zentangle. I think it's a great doodle.

This envelope came from Michelle. This is her first attempt at a Zentangle. I think it’s a great doodle!

This envelope came from Brigitte. I believe the coloring is a colored pencil.

This envelope came from Brigitte. I believe the coloring is a colored pencil.

This envelope came from Donna in 1997. White on pink makes such a strong statement.

This envelope came from Donna in 1997. White on pink makes such a strong statement.

Another envelope from Brigitte. I think the pink letters are actually stamps she made, probably from erasers.

Another envelope from Brigitte. I think the pink letters are actually stamps she made, probably from erasers.

This envelope came from Pam from back in 1997. I love the triangle stamp. It's from 1997.

This envelope came from Pam from back in 1997. I love the triangle stamp and how Pam did the calligraphy to make the stamp more noticeable.

This envelope is from Jan who absolutely loves stamps. Look just above the address at the little "snail mail" snail.

This envelope is from Jan who absolutely loves stamps. Look just above the address at the little “snail mail” snail.

There is so much you can do with envelopes. For more ideas see Jean Wilson’s blog: pushingtheevnelopes.

Happy creating, Candy

Halloween Envelopes and Ed Emberley’s Halloween Drawing Book Review

This is a 6" by 9" manilla envelope. The address will go to the left of the Spooky House.

This is a 6″ by 9″ manilla envelope. The address will go to the left of the Spooky House.

After a hectic week that included driving over 20 hours in three days and attending the funeral of a dear family friend, I decided I needed to make some upbeat, crazy fun art. So, I got out my Halloween box and fished around until I found a book I had purchased a number of years ago, Ed Emberley’s Halloween Drawing Book. The book is written for children (hey, I’m a kid at heart) and uses just a few basic lines and shapes for most of the drawings.

This is my copy of Ed Emberley's Halloween Drawing Book. There is a newer version currently in print.

This is my copy of Ed Emberley’s Halloween Drawing Book. There is a newer version currently in print.

Making Halloween envelopes sounded like fun. I love sending and receiving mail—real mail,the kind delivered by the post office—and I love to make special envelopes for my friends. For the first envelopes I made for this project, I used an 02 Pigma pen because it was what I had handy. It took me a long time to color in the black, so I would suggest a larger nib if you decide to make some of these yourself, especially the Spooky House. When I got to coloring the ground, I used my Pentel brush pen to color it and that took much less time to do.

This is a #10 business envelope with the address written with a white gel pen.

This is a #10 business envelope with the address written with a white gel pen.

The step-by-step instructions in the book are very easy to follow. There are symbols below each step of the drawing, and it is easy to see the progression. I purchased my copy of the book years ago, so I checked on Amazon to see if it was still available, and it is, in what looks like an updated version at a higher price. Ed Emberley has a series of books, and though I have only tried out this one book, I think his other books would also be a whole lot of fun for children (and some adults too).

My next project will be to make a drawing based on the instructions in the book, scan it into my computer and then print multiple copies of it. After all, it can take a significant amount of time to make some of the more complex drawings, and as lovely as they are, I have other art I want to be doing too. However, for keeping children occupied, maybe you will want to suggest they make all their drawings as originals.

Enjoy, Candy