Tag Archives: envelopes

Studio Snapshot – Birds From Blobs On Envelopes

With the Open Studio Tour behind me, I figured it was time to catch up on some overdue correspondence. So, this past week I played with making blobs into birds, ending up with some colorful, happy envelopes. If you missed the instructions for making birds from blobs, check out my blog post: DIY – From Blobs to Birds.

The birds on these envelopes started out as little watercolor blobs. I love how festive they look!

The birds on these envelopes started out as little watercolor blobs. I love how festive they look!

After making the envelopes, I went to my local Post Office and got their last birds stamps. I hope they get more because I plan on making more of these envelopes.

Close up of one of the envelopes. Each cof these birds started out as a blob of color on the envelope.

Close up of one of the envelopes. Each of these birds started out as a blob of color on the envelope.

I love how colorful these envelopes are. I demonstrated how to make these little birds during the Open Studio Tour, and they were instant hits.

Close up of one of the envelopes. Each of these birds started out as a blob of color on the envelope.

Close up of one of the envelopes. Each of these birds started out as a blob of color on the envelope.

I played around with different watercolors, and they all worked fine, even the inexpensive ones. All you need are some watercolor paints and a black marker.

Although you can't see it well in the photo, these birds were mad from metallic painted blobs. They really sparkle in person.

Although you can’t see it well in the photo, these birds were mad from metallic painted blobs. They really sparkle.

These envelopes are sure to brighten someone’s day. Why not try making some of your own?

NOTE: 
For those of you who have signed up to receive my blog posts by email, please know that there was some sort of program glitch this past month and many of the blog posts did not get sent. So, you may want to check my blog itself to see what you missed.

www.mypaperarts.com

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Square Paper Envelopes From Magazines & Catalogs

There is a monthly First Friday Art Walk in Ashland, Oregon where I have my studio at the Ashland Art Center. During the Art Walk I usually demonstrate a paper project to those who visit my studio. Last Friday I demonstrated how to make square envelopes from paper circles. I originally made my square circles from gift bags. (See the link to my blog post with instructions at the end of this article.) This time I tried a magazine, a woman’s clothing catalog and an old gallery guide.

Square Paper envelopes made from a catalog, magazine and an old gallery guide.

Square Paper envelopes made from a catalog, magazine and an old gallery guide.

The paper was lighter weight than the gift bags, but the envelopes came out wonderfully. What I like the best about these envelopes is how colorful they are. And those of you who follow my blog know how much I like color!

Two envelopes made from this National Geographic magazine.

Two envelopes made from this National Geographic magazine.

I love the photos in the National Geographic magazine, but their magazine pages are too small to make most envelopes. Not so when you only need circles. With their abundance of double page spreads, I was able to get quite a number of gorgeous envelopes. I was able to get two circles per page using a CD as my template.

This photo shows a number of double spreads from the National Geographic magazine that became envelopes like the square envelope on the lower left that was made from a woman's clothing catalog.

This photo shows a number of double spreads from the National Geographic magazine that became envelopes like the square envelope on the lower left that was made from a woman’s clothing catalog.

I also had an old gallery guide that I cut many circles from. Then I arranged them by color or mood and made a number of  envelopes.

My favorite envelope, frozen fowers.

My favorite envelope, frozen flowers.

Here is the link to the instructions to make these envelopes: DIY – Square Envelopes Made From Paper Circles

HINT:
With the lighter weight paper I found glue stick to be my preferred glue. The liquid glue made the paper wrinkle a bit.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – DIY Gift Card Origami Envelope

What do you get for a high school or college grad? These days more and more people are giving either money or gift cards. So, I decided to make some good looking envelopes for those gift cards.

These origami envelopes are the perfect size to hole a gift card.

These origami envelopes are the perfect size to hole a gift card.

A couple of weeks ago on my blog post, DIY Origami Envelopes, I mentioned that they could be made in different sizes, depending on what size square you started with. I took my own advice and played with different sizes and found a perfect size square to make envelopes for gift cards.

These origami envelopes can be made the perfect size to hold gift cards.

These origami envelopes can be made the perfect size to hold gift cards.

Start with a slightly larger than 5″ square piece of text weight paper. I used a 5 and 1/8 inch square. Not all gift cards are exactly the same size, so I used a square slightly larger than 5″ so hopefully any gift card will fit in it.

These origami envelopes can be made the perfect size to hold gift cards.

These origami envelopes can be made the perfect size to hold gift cards.

I demonstrated how to make these gift card origami envelopes last Friday during the First Friday Art Walk. For my envelopes, I printed out digital prints of my paste papers on 20# copy paper. You can find lovely papers at art supply stores and scrapbook stores.

I love these origami envelopes! They can be made the perfect size to hold gift cards.

I love these origami envelopes! They can be made the perfect size to hold gift cards.

See more of my origami envelopes along with links to both video and print instructions on my blog post: DIY Origami Envelopes.

Happy folding, Candy

Paste Paper Envelopes & Gold Brush Pen

I really enjoy Jean Wilson’s blog, Pushing The Envelopes. Jean is a fellow calligrapher who is an avid mail art enthusiast. She regularly hosts mail art envelope exchanges. This is what I send out for September’s exchange.

Envelopes made from paste papers in autumn colors. Gold brush pen on bottom right.

Envelopes made from paste papers in autumn colors. Gold brush pen (bottom right) was used to write the names on envelopes.

I made my envelopes out of autumn colors of paste papers I made in August. After cutting and folding my envelopes, I used my new Kuretake Gold Metallic Brush Pen. I purchased it from Paper and Ink Arts last spring, but had never gotten around to trying it. Now that I have, I’ll be using is a lot more. I love it!

Paste paper envelopes with names and stamps. One of the envelopes goes to France and one to Australia.

Paste paper envelopes with names and stamps. One of the envelopes goes to France and one to Australia.

I really am going to have to play with different colors of backgrounds for my gold brush. It’s obvious that it shows up better on some backgrounds than others. I love trying new tools and this one is obviously a keeper.
Enjoy, Candy

DIY – Coordinating Stationery

I’ve been sending out letters and notes in my flower envelopes (see Flower Envelopes – The Process for how I make them). However, with all the effort I’ve gone through to make the envelopes, it seemed a shame that I didn’t have coordinating stationery to go with the envelopes. So, I decided to rectify that situation.

I used the same colors on the stripe on note paper that I used to paint the envelope and now it's coordinating stationery and not just a pretty envelope.

I used the same colors on the stripe of the note paper that I used to paint the envelope. I now have coordinating stationery, not just a pretty envelope.

I wanted something simple, yet have it match the colors and style of the envelope. I used a number of papers, both watercolor and light cover papers, papers from my stash. If I were to buy a paper, I think I’d try a quality medium weight bristol paper.

The first thing I did was to tape off the area on the paper that I wanted to paint. You can see I used blue painters tape.

The first thing I did was to tape off the area on the paper that I wanted to paint. You can see I used blue painters tape.

The envelopes I’ve been painting are A-7 envelopes and are designed to fit a card (or piece of paper) that is 5″ by 7″. So that’s the size I cut my papers. Then I used either blue painters tape (like in the photo) or transparent removable tape (not shown). I think artists tape would work better, but I don’t have any in my studio right now. I tend to work with what’s available at the moment I get my inspiration.

I painted gold over the orange, just as I did when I made my envelope.

I painted gold liquid acrylic over the orange of the Copic marker, just as I did when I made my envelope.

I taped off section of the paper a little over 1/2″ wide. Then I painted colors and or patterns that I used when making the envelope.

And while the gold paint was still wet I added the hot pink paint in some areas.

And while the gold paint was still wet I added the hot pink paint in some areas.

There was a deckle edge on some of the watercolor papers, so I taped off just the edge and painted it a coordinating color.

I painted the deckle edge on this watercolor paper the same color as the background on the envelope. I also painted a decoration that reminded me of the flower petals on the envelope.

I painted the deckle edge on this watercolor paper the same color as the background on the envelope. I also painted a decoration that reminded me of the flower petals on the envelope.

Just painting a deckle edge a coordinating color of an envelope could be just enough to make beautiful coordinating stationery. That would be simple and elegant (and a lot less work).

For the coordinating stationery here, I painted the background color of the envelope to the left of the patterned stipe. There are lots of options.

For the coordinating stationery here, I painted the background color of the envelope to the left of the patterned stipe. There are lots of options.

I didn’t match the envelope exactly. I just tried do something that had a similar feel and color so it felt like the stationery and envelope went together.

Here is another envelope where I colored the strip to the left of the patterned stripe on the coordinating notepaper.

Here is another envelope where I colored the strip to the left of the patterned stripe on the coordinating notepaper.

While I could have made a traditional notecard that’s blank inside, I decided to have just a single piece of paper. I can write my notes on one or both sides of the paper. I used a somewhat heavy paper, so the writing won’t show through the other side of the paper.

This should be titled "Pretty in Pink"

This should be titled “Pretty in Pink”

Since this flower with the black background was so dramatic, I had to come up with a design that looked dramatic too. I ended up putting a black stripe on each side of the pattern, along with gold dots that I also used on the envelope.

Since this envelope with the black background is so dramatic, I had to come up with a design that looked dramatic too. I ended up putting a black stripe on each side of the pattern, along with gold dots that I also used on the envelope.

This notecard shows how I plan on writing to my friends by writing their name in a coordinating color.

This notecard shows how I plan on writing to my friends by writing their name in a coordinating color.

This notecard has a painted deckle edge the same color as the background on the envelope.

Another example of a notecard with a painted deckle edge the same color as the background on the envelope.

Play and enjoy!

Here’s to happy letter writing, Candy

 

Studio Snapshot – Flower Envelope Series

I’ve been sending out a letter-a-day for the month of April in honor of it being National Letter Writing Month. My letters have all gone out in a handmade or hand decorated envelope. Somewhere during the month I made an envelope with a flower on it. I liked it and made another and another and another. And lo and behold, I realized I created a series.

One of the envelopes in my flower series. In this one the flower petals are watercolors and the background of the envelope was made with a Copic marker.

From my Flower Envelope Series. Made with watercolors (petals) and Copic markers.

I kept changing something with each new envelope. I tried new colors or centers of the flowers or number of flower petals or the kind of markers or watercolors I used. I experimented with lots of different ideas, but kept close to the same flower design for all the envelopes.

One of the envelopes in my Flower Envelope Series. This was made with Copic markers for both the flower and the background. The name was written with a white Sharpie marker.

From my Flower Envelope Series. Flower petals and background made with Copic markers. Name written with a white Sharpie marker.

It’s been interesting to try to combine colors that I would not usually use together. Sometimes the combination works, sometimes not so well.

From my Flower Envelope Series. Made with watercolors and Copic marker.

From my Flower Envelope Series. Made with watercolors (petals) and Copic markers.

I don’t think I am through making flower envelopes. I still have some ideas I want to play around with.

From my Flower Envelope Series. Made with Copic markers.

From my Flower Envelope Series. Made with Copic markers.

I won’t be making as many flower envelopes as I have been lately because many of them take hours to make and I have other things I want to make too. Still, you’re likely to see some more of them sometime in the future.

One of my Flower Envelope Series. Made with Copic markers and white Sharpie.

One of my Flower Envelope Series. Made with Copic markers and white Sharpie.

One of my Flower Envelope Series. Made with Copic marker, watercolors and white Sharpie.

One of my Flower Envelope Series. Made with Copic marker, watercolors, gold pen, and white Sharpie.

From my Flower Envelope Series made with Copic markers and white Sharpie marker.

One of my Flower Envelope Series. Made with Copic markers and white Sharpie.

One of my Flower Envelope Series. Made with Copic markers and white Sharpie.

One of my Flower Envelope Series. Made with Copic markers and white Sharpie.

One of my Flower Envelope Series. Lisa wanted me to make her an envelope with lots of yellow. I think this qualifies.

One of my Flower Envelope Series. Lisa wanted me to make her an envelope with lots of yellow. I think this qualifies.

One of my Flower Envelope Series. Made with Copic markers and white Sharpie.

One of my Flower Envelope Series. Made with Copic markers and Sharpie markers. Note how the Sharpie background shows the marker strokes more than the Copic markers.

One of my Flower Envelope Series. I'm not ready to let go of this one yet.

One of my Flower Envelope Series. I’m not ready to let go of this one yet.

One of my Flower Envelope Series. I'm not ready to let go of this one yet.

One of my Flower Envelope Series. I’m not ready to let go of this one yet.

One of my Flower Envelope Series. I'm not ready to let go of this one yet.

One of my Flower Envelope Series. I’m not ready to let go of this one yet.

One of my Flower Envelope Series. I'm not ready to let go of this one yet.

One of my Flower Envelope Series. I’m not ready to let go of this one yet.

I just finished the above envelope. It’s been a really fun month, making envelopes and writing letters for National Letter Writing Month.

Happy Letter Writing, Candy

Studio Snapshot – More Envelopes

While I had planned on making some other things this past week, I just couldn’t stop making envelopes. I even went to my local art store and bought over a dozen markers to play around with and see how they would work on my envelopes.

This envelope (with birthday card and envelope) was hand delivered to a family friend.

This envelope (with birthday card and envelope) was hand delivered to a family friend. The request came from his daughter and was a surprise.

These four envelopes and letters were made from a single sheet of paste paper. The envelope is folded in such a way that when it opens, the letter is on the back of the envelope.

These four envelopes and letters were made from a single sheet of paste paper. The envelope is folded in such a way that when it opens, the letter is on the back of the envelope.

This envelope went to Jennifer.

This envelope, with letter, went to Jennifer.

These two envelopes were inspired by some flower stamps I just purchased. They also highlighted my need for some better markers to make backgrounds. The backgrounds on these were made with a Pentel color brush.

These two envelopes were inspired by some flower stamps I just purchased. They also highlighted my need for some better markers to make backgrounds. The backgrounds on these were made with a Pentel color brush.

I gave this box (which I used to hold a letter, thus making it an envelope) to my neighbor for her birthday. Blog post and template: DIY Triangle Boxes.

I gave this box (which I used to hold a letter, thus making it an envelope) to my neighbor for her birthday. Blog post and template: DIY Triangle Boxes.

Three envelopes made from my original paste papers designed so that the letter is on the inside of the envelope.

Three envelopes made from my original paste papers designed so that the letter is on the inside of the envelope.

Playing with watercolors and gold.

Playing with watercolors and gold.

I bought this Sharpie water based marker and found it wrote wonderfully even over the silver on my paste papers.

I bought this Sharpie water based marker and found it wrote wonderfully even over the silver on my paste papers.

I made this envelope using my new Copic markers. I love how the background doesn't show my strokes like the other two envelopes with flowers.

I made this envelope using my new Copic markers. I love how the background doesn’t show my strokes like the other two envelopes with flowers.

I am having so much fun making envelopes and writing letters for National Letter Writing Month.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Winter Themed Mail Art

This past December I participated in winter themed envelope exchange. I’ve always loved sending and receiving wonderful envelopes and cards in the mail. Being able to hold and feel the envelope makes if feel more special than an email. I love being able to put my treasures in a box and come back to them again and again and become inspired by them all over again.

This envelope came from Eric in France.

This envelope came from Eric in France.

So here are photos of the envelopes that have been arriving over the past month. Some are watercolor designs. Some are done in calligraphy. Some envelopes are handmade. I love the variety.

This envelope is from Susan.

This envelope is from Susan.

This watercolored envelope is from Karen.

This watercolored envelope is from Karen. 

This is the back of Chuck's envelope. And somehow it got to me without a stamp.

This is the back of Chuck’s envelope. And somehow it got to me without a stamp.

This envelope is from Wendy.

This envelope is from Wendy.

This envelope with my address in the fireplace is from Saba.

This envelope with my address in the fireplace is from Saba.

This envelope and card is from Marti.

This envelope and card is from Marti.

This Christmas tree envelope is from Cathy.

This Christmas tree envelope is from Cathy.

This handmade envelope is from Phillip. Notice the stamp is on the left of the envelope.

This handmade envelope is from Phillip. Notice the stamp is on the left of the envelope.

This envelope is from Jean Wilson.

This envelope is from Jean Wilson.

This envelope is from Hester. It wraps around and has a message and ornament on the back.

This envelope is from Hester. It wraps around and has a message and ornament on the back.

My snowman envelope came from another Chuck.

My snowman envelope came from another Chuck.

This envelope came from Janet.

This envelope came from Janet.

This envelope came from Florence.

This envelope came from Florence.

Another Christmas tree envelope. This was from Elena.

Another Christmas tree envelope. This was from Elena.

And a big Thank You to Jan who spearheaded the exchange.

And a big Thank You to Jan who spearheaded the exchange.

If you are interested in seeing more examples of mail art, be sure to check out Jean Wilson’s blog: Pushing the Envelopes and Phillip’s Blog: Envelope 100. You can see the envelopes I sent out on my Blog post: DIY Snowflake Envelope.

Enjoy, Candy

DIY Snowflake Envelope

I love sending cards and envelopes through the old fashioned US Postal Service, aka Snail Mail. I know it’s faster and and cheaper to do email, but I do so enjoy receiving and holding physical cards and envelopes. So, with this in mind, I signed up to do a Holiday Envelope Exchange.

My first batch of envelopes went out on Monday. These went out today.

My first batch of envelopes went out on Monday. These went out today.

Since I have lots I am doing right now, I decided to make my envelopes for the Holiday Envelope Exchange the same design I’m using for my own Holiday Cards. My Holiday Cards are predominately blue with snowflakes. So, I decided to take a scanned paste paper of a similar blue color and put white embossed snowflakes on it. The actual color is “silver pearl.”

Here is a close up of one of the "silver pearl" embossed snowflakes. I love that it's so subtle. Depending on the light, it may take a second look to see it.

Here is a close up of one of the “silver pearl” embossed snowflakes. I love that it’s so subtle. Depending on the light, it may take a second look to see it.

My card was designed to fit a standard A-7 envelope. Since you may have a different size envelope you are working with, the simple answer is to take apart your chosen size envelope and trace its pattern on the decorated paper you want to use. I suggest using a text weight paper for your envelope. If you need to shop for paper, check your local art supply store or scrapbooking store for your decorated paper.

I steamed open the envelope on the left and used it as my pattern for the envelope on the left. I didn't bother with rounding any of the corners or having a deckled edge on the flap.

I steamed open the envelope on the right and used it as my pattern for the envelope on the left. I didn’t bother with rounding any of the corners or having a deckled edge on the flap.

Note to self: steaming open an envelope looks so easy on TV, but is a bit harder in real life. Or, maybe I just need more practice.

After cutting out my envelope (and before pasting the envelope together), I stamped a snowflake on the envelope in two places and sprinkled silver pearl embossing powder over the stamped area. I shook off the excess powder, then heated the embossing powder with a heat gun. Before I bought myself a heat gun, I used to use hold my paper over a toaster or light bulb. Be careful not to singe the paper if you do that.

The envelopes on the left are ready to go out. The ones on the right are works in progress.

The envelopes on the left are ready to go out. The ones on the right are still works in progress.

Next (again before pasting the envelope together), I wrote the recipient’s first name in calligraphy with blue ink on the envelope. Then I pasted up the sides of the envelopes, inserted my card in the envelopes, finished addressing the envelopes and put on the stamps.

It did take me longer to make the envelopes than I had remembered, but it really was fun.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Handmade Holiday Envelopes

This past week I have been making envelopes for the Holiday Cards I showed a couple of weeks ago. It’s taking quite a while to make them. I’ll give details on how to make them on Thursday’s blog post, so stay tuned.

These are going to be envelopes in which I am going to be sending out my Holiday Cards. It's hard to see, but each envelope has 2 embossed snowflakes on it.

These are going to be envelopes in which I am going to be sending out my Holiday Cards. It’s hard to see, but each of the envelopes has 2 embossed snowflakes, one in the upper left corner and one in the lower right corner.

Enjoy, Candy

DIY Folded Envelope with Enclosure Card

I’m not sure what to call this little envelope and card. It’s not something that can be sent in the mail, but it’s such a sweet little envelope and coordinating card. I demonstrated how to make these at the Calligraphers’ Guild meeting earlier this week. They were a great hit, so I thought I’d share them here.

The card slips inside the folded envelope.

The card slips inside the folded envelope.

Start with a text weight paper that is 4 times as wide as it is tall. For the envelope above, I used a paper that was 4″ by 16″. For the envelope below I used a paper that was 2″ by 8″.

This is a piece of paste paper that I painted. The paper is 80# text weight Mohawk Superfine.

This is a piece of paste paper that I painted. The paper is 80# text weight Mohawk Superfine.

With text paper it is possible to fold either with or against the grain of the paper, however you will get the best results if you fold the paper with the grain. For information on paper grain and how to tell the direction of paper grain on a piece of paper, see my blog post: Understanding Paper Grain Direction.

Fold the paper in half as shown below.

The paste paper is now folded in half.

The paste paper is now folded in half.

Open the paper back up and fold the left side of the paper to the center fold.

The left side of the paper is folded to the center.

The left side of the paper is folded to the center.

Open up the paper and fold down the top left corner to the bottom of the closest vertical fold.

Why this photo came out black and white, I have no idea. But it's the only one I have that shows the diagonal fold.

Why this photo came out black and white, I have no idea. But it’s the only one I have that shows the diagonal fold.

Now fold the right side of the paper to the center fold.

The right side of the paper is now folded to the center fold.

The right side of the paper is now folded to the center fold.

Now fold a diagonal fold between the center and the fold you just created. See the photo below.

Fold the right side down on a diagonal as shown above.

Fold the right side down on a diagonal as shown above.

Now comes what seems to be a tricky part for people to understand. Look carefully at the photo below for help. Flip up the bottom of the paper below the diagonal fold you just made. You will end up only seeing the back of the paper once the fold is made. See the photo below.

The paper is now folded up so that you now only see the wrong side of the paper to the right of the center fold. See photo above.

The paper is folded up so that you now only see the wrong side of the paper to the right of the center fold in the photo above.

The right side of the paper is now folded over to the left so that you can now see the right side of the paper that you just folded up. You can also now see the diagonal fold that was folded before too.

When the right side of the paper is folded to the left, the diagonal fold and the previous fold up are now visible.

When the right side of the paper is folded to the left, the diagonal fold and the previous fold up are now visible.

The last step is to tuck the left flap behind the diagonal fold. Now the envelope is done.

Once the flap on the left is folded behind the diagonal fold, the envelope is done.

Once the flap on the left is folded behind the diagonal fold, the envelope is done.

 

The flap is now folded behind the diagonal. The envelope is finished.

The flap is now folded behind the diagonal. The envelope is finished.

Next cut a piece of paper to fit your square envelope. It should be twice as wide as it is tall. Then fold it in half to fit in the envelope.

I've chosen an orange paper for the envelope. It is folded in half and is ready to be decorated.

I’ve chosen an orange paper for the envelope. It is folded in half and is ready to be decorated.

I like to decorate the paper I use for the enclosure card. For this envelope, I thought an orange card would coordinate nicely. I saved some scraps to the paste paper and decided to use that along with some black and gold paper to create an interesting design on the front of the card.

Here the card has been decorated.

Here the card has been decorated.

 

The card is now in its matching envelope.

The card is now in its matching envelope.

Here are some photos of the folded envelopes and cards that some of the calligraphers were working on during my demonstration and mini workshop. I thought they would inspire you to think of new ways to make your own enclosure card and folded envelope.

2014 DIY Folded Envelope with 16

 

2014 DIY Folded Envelope with 17

 

2014 DIY Folded Envelope with 18

 

2014 DIY Folded Envelope with 19

 

2014 DIY Folded Envelope with 20

 

2014 DIY Folded Envelope with 21

 

2014 DIY Folded Envelope with 22

 

2014 DIY Folded Envelope with 23

 

2014 DIY Folded Envelope with 24

I know Halloween has already past, but this could be something to work on for next year.

This would be great for a Halloween card.

This would be great for a Halloween card.

 

For this card I sewed a white insert inside and tied the threads on the outside.

For this card I sewed a white insert inside and tied the threads on the outside.

Happy creating, Candy

DIY Halloween Pumpkin Face Envelope

I love the change of seasons from summer to autumn. Even though the days can still be warm, the evenings are wonderfully cool. The mornings feel crisp and there’s a tang in the air, the trees are starting to change the colors of their leaves. At this time of year, I can’t help but think about the upcoming holiday of Halloween, and of course, pumpkins.

These Halloween Pumpkin envelopes are fun to make. I made them for children during the First Friday Art Walk and they loved them!

These Halloween Pumpkin envelopes are fun to make. I made them for children during the First Friday Art Walk and they loved them!

I got the idea of making a fun Halloween envelope from some black wrapping paper I found at Paper Source and some orange paper I had here in my studio. I made a small catalog envelope template (there’s a template for you at the bottom of the blog post) and drew a simple pumpkin face to fit on the front.

After printing the envelope template on computer paper, trace the design onto black paper by using colored transfer paper (similar to carbon paper, but not as messy).

After printing the envelope template on computer paper, trace the design onto black paper by using colored transfer paper (similar to carbon paper, but not as messy).

Here is what it looks like after tracing the template onto black paper.

Here is what it looks like after tracing the template onto black paper.

Make a pumpkin face design of your choice and trace it on the inside of the open envelope.

Make a pumpkin face design of your choice and trace it on the inside of the open envelope.

Cut the envelope out with a craft knife (or scissors) and fold the envelope (but don't  glue or tape the envelope yet).

Cut the envelope out with a craft knife (or scissors) and fold the envelope (but don’t glue or tape the envelope yet).

After printing the template on white copy paper, I traced the template (both the cut and fold lines) onto the back of the black paper using blue transfer paper, because I knew that regular transfer or carbon paper wouldn’t show up well on black paper. And printing on black paper was out of the question. My colored transfer paper was purchased at my local art supply store. If you don’t have or can’t get colored transfer paper, see the other options below.

Cut out the pumpkin face with a craft knife. Here I've cut out the eyes and put a piece of orange paper behind one of the eyes.

Cut out the pumpkin face with a craft knife. Here I’ve cut out the eyes and put a piece of orange paper behind one of the eyes.

Once I cut out my envelope, I centered the pumpkin face on the back of my envelope and traced the pattern, again using my colored transfer paper. Then, I cut out the face from the back of the envelope. The orange paper was glued to the back of the envelope with glue stick, then the envelope was folded, and double sided tape was used to glue it together.

Here I've pasted a piece of orange paper behind the face. Now you can paste or use double sided tape to close the envelope.

Here I’ve pasted a piece of orange paper behind the face. Now you can paste or use double sided tape to close the envelope.

I made my pumpkin mouth large enough to write a name or name and address in. Unfortunately, although this is a mailable envelope size, the cut out face makes it impossible for it to go through the postal machines. If you want to mail this envelope, you can’t cut out your pumpkin face, but you could draw the face on your envelope.

Options If You Don’t Have Colored Transfer Paper

1. You can use bar soap to cover the back of the your envelope template before tracing your envelope on black paper. You will need to reapply the soap each time before you trace.

2. You can print the envelope template on orange paper and place a piece of black paper behind the cut out face.

This envelope doesn't have any cut outs. I used the small catalog template and printed it on orange paper. Then I drew the pumpkin face on the envelope with a black marker. I will be writing the address either under the eyes in a black pen or in the mouth with a white gel pen.

This envelope doesn’t have any cut outs. I used the small catalog envelope template and printed it on orange paper. Then I drew the pumpkin face on the envelope with a black marker. I will be writing the address either under the eyes in a black pen or in the mouth with a white gel pen.

Click here to download the Small Catalog Envelope template

Happy creating, Candy

Envelope Mail Art

This is an envelope I sent to Jean Wilson. If you are interested in mail art, check out Jeans blog pushingtheenvelopes.

This is an envelope I sent to Jean Wilson. If you are interested in mail art, check out Jeans blog pushingtheenvelopes.

I love sending and receiving mail the “old fashioned” way, in actual physical envelopes with hand written addresses. Being a calligrapher as well as an artist, and having lots of friends with similar interests, I have sent and received some very interesting envelopes. I hope the following examples spark some interest in sending some fun mail art to your friends.

(You may notice that some of the addresses appear incomplete. Aside from Jean Wilson, whose address is freely shared on her envelope blog, I felt it best to digitally remove the addresses from my images before posting them for all the world to see.)

Here is an envelope that Jean sent to me.

Here is an envelope that Jean sent to me. The “gingerbread” in the stamp is echoed in my name.

Here are the envelopes I sent out for the envelope exchange. (see photo below for how they looked before I added the addresses and stamps).

Here are the envelopes I sent out for the envelope exchange. (see photo below for how they looked before I added the addresses and stamps).

This is how the envelopes looked as I started, with just the hand hearts. I used three different watercolors and one acrylic iridescent ink.

This is how the envelopes looked as I started, with just the hand hearts. I used three different colors of watercolor and one acrylic iridescent ink.

This envelope came from Tammie in 1997. Notice the 32 cent stamp.

This envelope came from Tammie in 1997. Notice the 32 cent stamp.

This envelope and note card started out as handmade paper made and given to me by a friend. My mother did the Chinese brush painting on the front of them. I love them too much to actually use them.

This envelope and note card started out as handmade paper made and given to me by a friend. I asked my mother to do the Chinese brush painting on the front of them. I love them too much to actually use them.

This envelope came from Sandy. It's from 1995. Again, notice the 32 cent stamp.

This envelope came from Sandy. It’s from 1995. Again, notice the 32 cent stamp.

This card and envelope came from Cathy from Mississippi. She said she never uses orange, but was inspired by the stamp to try it. I think it worked out GREAT!

This card and envelope came from Cathy from Mississippi. She said she never uses orange, but was inspired by the stamp to try it. I think it worked out GREAT!

This envelope came from Susan, who is obviously a very practiced calligrapher. She wrote on the paper first, then made it into an envelope. This is another case where the stamp and envelope decoration work together to create a work of art.

This envelope came from Susan, who is obviously a very practiced calligrapher. She wrote on the paper first, then made it into an envelope. This is another case where the stamp and envelope decoration work together to create a work of art.

This colorful envelope came from Betty. I love how fresh the colors are here.

This colorful envelope came from Betty. I love how fresh the colors are here.

This envelope came from Michelle. This is her first attempt at a Zentangle. I think it's a great doodle.

This envelope came from Michelle. This is her first attempt at a Zentangle. I think it’s a great doodle!

This envelope came from Brigitte. I believe the coloring is a colored pencil.

This envelope came from Brigitte. I believe the coloring is a colored pencil.

This envelope came from Donna in 1997. White on pink makes such a strong statement.

This envelope came from Donna in 1997. White on pink makes such a strong statement.

Another envelope from Brigitte. I think the pink letters are actually stamps she made, probably from erasers.

Another envelope from Brigitte. I think the pink letters are actually stamps she made, probably from erasers.

This envelope came from Pam from back in 1997. I love the triangle stamp. It's from 1997.

This envelope came from Pam from back in 1997. I love the triangle stamp and how Pam did the calligraphy to make the stamp more noticeable.

This envelope is from Jan who absolutely loves stamps. Look just above the address at the little "snail mail" snail.

This envelope is from Jan who absolutely loves stamps. Look just above the address at the little “snail mail” snail.

There is so much you can do with envelopes. For more ideas see Jean Wilson’s blog: pushingtheevnelopes.

Happy creating, Candy