Tag Archives: origami

Paper Cranes

I took a friend to a doctor’s office in Mesa, Arizona and was greeted by these wonderful paper cranes. I love discovering paper art, especially in unexpected places.

Paper cranes found in a doctor’s office.

Paper cranes found in a doctor’s office.

Paper cranes found in a doctor’s office.

I love the idea of using folded origami paper cranes as a room divider.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Art On The Go! – Folding Origami Mandalas

I’m finding that it’s been harder to do art while traveling than I had supposed. As I have written earlier, Paul and I are on a 2 month trip in our 19′ van. It took a bit of preparation to cut and package the few art supplies I could fit between our clothes and food.

It takes 8 pieces of paper 1″ by 4″ to make one origami mandala.

So far, I’ve not been able spend as much time making art as I would like. On days when we drive 8 to 12 plus hours, very little art gets done.

Origami mandalas I’ve made so far on our trip. These will be made into finished pieces once I get home.

We’ve been doing a lot of visiting with family and friends. While I’ve been able to eek out a bit of  time for folding and box making, it’s been in very short periods of time. We’ve also been making new friends, attending numerous potlucks, dancing, trying new foods and restaurants, hiking and so much more. We’ll be visiting Biosphere 2 this next week and probably a number of other places. This is leaving me less time for my art than I expected. But, I am relaxing and enjoying myself.

Sometimes I just have a few minutes, so I can fold just a few pieces and add to my stash of folded paper to make into my origami mandalas.

I’m still trying to get into a rhythm for my days. This traveling is new to me and I’m loving it. I know everything will fall into place eventually. Meanwhile, I’ll keep trying to eek out my art in small periods of time.

Enjoy, Candy

2016 Year End Review and Preview of 2017

As 2016 comes to a close, I am amazed at how much art I accomplished while attending to the needs of others. 2016 has been the most stressful year of my life, and I think making art has been what got me through the year. I would not have made as much art this past year if I had not felt so committed to all of you who read and comment on my blog. I wish to thank you from the bottom of my heart.

My square envelopes with interlocking heart closure was one of my favorite DIY projects of 2016. DIY – Square Envelope With Interlocking Heart Closure

The square envelope with an interlocking heart closure is one of my favorite DIY’s from 2016. It has also received a lot of shares on the internet.

This Paper Origami Mandala is made with 8 pieces of paper 4 times longer in height as in width. DIY – Tea Bag Folding & Paper Origami Rosettes

My most popular blog post from 2016 was: DIY – Tea Bag Folding & Paper Origami Rosettes. This post includes links to instructions to make a number of different patterns.

This tea bag rosette was made from 8 tea bag wrappers like the one in the photo above. DIY – Tea Bag Folding & Origami Rosettes.

I actually save my tea bag wrappers, fold them, and make origami rosettes. The above photo shows one of the many patterns that can be made using tea bag wrappers.

These Puffy Pentagon Boxes are perfect to hold a Chocolate Dagoba Taster Square. DIY – Puffy Pentagon Box

I designed my Puffy Pentagon Box for the Oregon Chocolate Festival. This has been a favorite of many of my personal friends as well as those who read my blog on the internet. You can download the template from my blog post: DIY – Puffy Pentagon Box.

These origami envelopes are fun to make and quite addictive, too. They were another favorite DIY blog post. DIY Origami Envelope

I wish to thank Paula Bearded Krieg for the instructions for these wonderful envelopes. My blog post: DIY Origami Envelope includes a link to her instructions.

This photo shows the different burl wood I was looking at for the base of this Nuptial Spirit Vessel. Nuptial Spirit Vessel – The Processl

Although I can look at the numbers and know which post got the most views, it’s impossible to decide which is my most successful blog post of the year. Some posts are viewed a lot. Others have lots of comments. Some are shared a lot, or have lots of Facebook likes or are pinned on Pinterest. Some blog posts have been up for most of the year and some only a few months or weeks.

Two little birds made from watercolor blobs. DIY – From Blobs To Birds

Going through my statistics, I found that my blog has been viewed from 168 countries. The internet is an amazing place. I am so happy that I can reach so many people who love paper art.

50 triangle boxes are a whole lot of boxes.

My most popular photo on Pinterest brings thousands of views to the blog post 50 Triangle Boxes for a 50th Wedding Anniversary.

Quite a few of my older blog posts are still getting a lot of views too. 50 Triangle Boxes for A 50th Wedding Anniversary gets thousands of views from a photo on Pinterest. The DIY – Triangle Boxes, which includes a link to the template for making these triangle boxes, gets lots of views too.

Winter Walk book designed by Camille Riner that I made from her digital files. This photo has been shared a lot on Pinterest. Tiny Winter Walk Book

So what’s ahead for 2017? Obviously I will continue to do DIY blog posts. There will also be a lot of Art On The Go! blog posts about the paper art I make and see on my travels. And I will be writing about practicing random kindness and senseless acts of beauty throughout 2017 too.

Happy New Year! I look forward to a new and wonderfully creative 2017.

Enjoy, Candy

Paper Pop Up Trees from Helen Hiebert’s 2017 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar

I purchased Helen Hiebert’s 2017 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar earlier this fall. The first month is December 2016, so it’s really a 13 month calendar along with a paper project for each month including instructions and templates.

Paper Pop Up Tree from Helen Hiebert's 2017 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar.

Paper Pop Up Trees from Helen Hiebert’s 2017 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar.

In addition to the calendar, I also purchased a custom paper pack which includes paper and materials for each project. I haven’t used my custom paper for my Pop Up Tree yet as I want to play around with different possibilities first.

Paper Pop Up Tree from Helen Hiebert's 2017 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar.

Paper Pop Up Tree from Helen Hiebert’s 2017 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar.

I made the light green tree first. I just used green copy paper. I used a wrapping paper sample for the green and silver tree. I also put a gold bead on the top and strung gold threat down the inside folds.

Paper Pop Up Tree from Helen Hiebert's 2017 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar.

Paper Pop Up Tree from Helen Hiebert’s 2017 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar.

I will be demonstrating this Paper Pop Up Tree in my studio at the Ashland Art Center during the First Friday Art Walk this Friday. It’s a fun project, great for adults as well as kids. I will have my calendar there so you can take a look at it and the projects in case you want to purchase one for a gift, or for yourself.

This is December's calendar page.

This is the calendar page for December 2016.

If you would like to purchase your own calendar: 2017 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar.

You can also check out Helen Hiebert’s Facebook page: 25 Days of Paper.

Enjoy, Candy

Memories Of My Dad: Tea Bag Folding Holiday Garland

Every Monday I my dad and I would go out to his favorite restaurant for lunch. While we would order different items from the menu, our beverages were always the same. He would order English Breakfast Tea and I would order Green Tea. When I started folding tea bag wrappers early this year, we started saving our tea bag wrappers from our Monday lunches.

Holiday Garland made from tea bag wrappers. I sewed them together with gold thread.

Holiday Garland made from tea bag wrappers. They are sewed together with gold thread.

I realized that our tea bag wrappers were red and green, the perfect color combination for the holiday season. I played around with different combinations, all green and all red, but my favorite was the red and green together.

Our tea bag wrappers along with the front and back of the folded rosettes.

Our tea bag wrappers along with the front and back of the folded rosettes.

My original plan was to make red and green tea bag garlands to decorate my dad’s Christmas tree. I showed him my idea and he loved it. Unfortunately my dad passed away a little over a month ago. I am now making these garlands as a memory of our Monday lunches together.

Close up of the folded rosette.

Close up of the folded rosette.

Each garland has eight 2″ by 2″ squares cut from the front of the tea bag wrapper. You can see how they are folded in the above photo. The pieces are then glued together to make the rosette.

Front and back of the rosettes along with the folded squares ready to become another rosette.

Front and back of the rosettes along with the folded squares ready to become another rosette.

If you are interested in making some of these yourself, check out my blog post: DIY – Tea Bag Folding & Paper Origami Rosettes.

Start creating your own memories!

Enjoy, Candy

DIY Holiday Origami Envelopes

Today I thought I would share some Christmas envelopes I made for my friend Margie. She had seen the ones I made earlier this year and wanted some made from Christmas wrapping paper.

The papers for these origami envelopes are from a holiday gift paper sample book.

The papers for these origami envelopes are from a holiday gift paper sample book.

Back in April, during National Letter Writing Month, I made a number of these envelopes using scanned images of my paste papers. I then found I could make them the perfect size for gift cards (the perfect gift for new grads).

Close up of some holiday origami envelopes made from gift wrap sample paper.

Close up of some holiday origami envelopes made from gift wrap sample paper.

Now, using wrapping paper from sample books that were given to me, I made a bunch of holiday origami envelopes.

HINT: It is best to work with quality wrapping paper, not the cheap variety. I found this out the hard way. I started with some cheap wrapping paper a friend gave me, but I didn’t like the way it folded. Luckily my friends at Nimbus, a local Ashland gallery, gifted me some samples of wrapping paper at just the right time. So, get a heavier weight quality wrapping paper to get the best results.

Close up of some holiday origami envelopes made from gift wrap sample paper.

Close up of some holiday origami envelopes made from gift wrap sample paper.

You can find links to the instructions to make these envelopes on my blog post: DIY Origami Envelope.
And to check out how to make them the size for gift cards, you can see my blog post: DIY Gift Card Origami Envelope.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Playing With My New Chiyogami Papers

This past week I’ve been making paper lotus flowers, origami mandalas and paper wrapped pencils out of the new Chiyogami papers I received from Washi Arts. I shared the photo of the papers I received on my last post and here is what I’ve been doing with them.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

I love these papers! The colors are spectacular and they fold beautifully. Yes, they are expensive, but so worth it.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

Paper Lotus Flower, Origami Mandala and paper wrapped pencils made from Chiyogami paper.

If you haven’t tried Chiyogami paper, treat yourself to a sheet. It’s a wonderful experience.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Paper Lotus Flowers

My studio this past week has been a chair beside a hospital bed. A dear family member had a massive stroke. It’s been an emotional week, but making paper lotus flowers has proved to be calming and meditative.

Paper Lotus Flower made from Chiyogami and metallic silver papers.

Paper Lotus Flower made from Chiyogami and metallic silver papers.

Luckily I had already cut the papers for a number of paper lotus flowers. I simply put the papers, waxed linen thread, scissors, a pencil and a clipboard in a box and took it with me to the hospital.

Paper Lotus Flowers

Paper Lotus Flowers

I sat and was present while we listened to soothing music. I folded while my family member slept.

This Paper Lotus Flower was made from wrapping paper and gold metallic paper.

This Paper Lotus Flower was made from wrapping paper and gold metallic paper.

Paper Lotus Flowers

Paper Lotus Flowers

Paper Lotus Flower

Paper Lotus Flower

Paper Lotus Flowers

Paper Lotus Flowers

With love, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Starting Another Earth Spirit Vessel

This past week I started another Earth Spirit Vessel. There’s actually a lot of work that needs to be done before I start building the vessel itself. For this vessel, I chose a pure white paper and combined it with painted paste papers of various shades of green with gold highlights.

This is the beginning of another Earth Spirit Vessel.

This is the beginning of another Earth Spirit Vessel.

I started out with  papers that were 19.5″ by 25″ and then cut them into 2″ by 4″ pieces of paper. On 25 of the pieces of paper I wrote inspirations and quotes related to Nature and Mother Earth.  I then hand folded each of the papers nine times. You can see the triangular folded pieces in the above photo.

This is one of the 25 quotes that I calligraphed for this Earth Spirit Vessel.

This is one of the 25 quotes that I calligraphed for this Earth Spirit Vessel.

After all the preparation, I got to start putting the Earth Spirit Vessel together. I built it one row at a time.

I don't yet have a name for this Earth Spirit Vessel. I think the name will come to me as I continue to build it and decide what I'm going to do with the green as far as a design.

I don’t yet have a name for this Earth Spirit Vessel. I think the name will come to me as I continue to build it and decide what I’m going to do with the green as far as a design.

After I got each row in position, I took off one folded piece at a time and glued it to the piece below. The gluing is not actually necessary, but it means that the shape of the vessel stays intact. Note: I only raised boys, so I know how easily they could dismantle something like this. And although I offer to make my Earth Spirit Vessels without glue, no one has ever taken me up on the offer. I think that’s very smart of them.

View from above of my latest Earth Spirit Vessel in progress.

View from above of my latest Earth Spirit Vessel in progress.

Yes, it does take a lot of work to make each vessel. It’s a wonderfully meditative process and I truly enjoy making each and every one.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – New Earth Spirit Vessel: Autumn Blaze

This past week I have been finishing up my latest Earth Spirit Vessel, Autumn Blaze. I actually started this last fall, but was so busy this past winter and spring, that I never got it finished. So after coming back from a wonderful calligraphy and art retreat, I decided to finish some past projects before I delved into starting new pieces of paper art.

Earth Spirit Vessel, Autumn Blaze made from folded paper.

Earth Spirit Vessel, Autumn Blaze made from folded paper.

Some of the papers in Autumn Blaze are hand painted paste papers. I included gold powder in the paste paper. It gives the vessel a subtle glow that isn’t quite apparent in the photo.

The beginning of making Earth Spirit Vessel, Autumn Blaze.

The beginning of making Earth Spirit Vessel, Autumn Blaze.

Autumn Blaze contains 592 pieces of hand folded pieces of 2″ by 4″ paper. Each piece of paper is folded 9 times and glued in place. While it is not necessary to glue the pieces, I have never had anyone want a vessel that was not glued. I only raised boys, and I know how inquisitive minds like to take things apart to see how they were made. I think my customers must think like me.

Earth Spirit Vessel, Autumn Blaze as it is beginning to take shape.

Earth Spirit Vessel, Autumn Blaze as it is starting to take shape.

If you want to know more about my Earth Spirit Vessels, you can check out these blog posts of mine:
Earth Spirit Vessels
Earth Spirit Vessels – The Process
Earth Spirit Vessels From My Paste Paper Show

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Making More Truffle Boxes

I made Truffle Boxes for my dad and his friends for Father’s Day. They were a big hit, so this past week I made a bunch more out of my hand painted paste papers.

These Truffle Boxes are made from my hand painted paste papers. They're the perfect size box to hold a single truffle.

These Truffle Boxes are made from my hand painted paste papers. They’re the perfect size box to hold a single truffle.

If you are wondering what paste papers are, you can check out my blog post: Making Paste Papers: Part One. And if you are wanting to make paste papers, you can check out my blog post: Paste Paper Recipes.

These Truffle Boxes are held closed by a ribbon with a bead on each end.

These Truffle Boxes are held closed by a ribbon with a bead on each end of the ribbon.

If you would like to make some Truffle Boxes of your own, check out my blog post: DIY Truffle Box With Template.

I have included a link to my blog post that has instructions and a template so you can make your own Truffle Boxes.

I have included a link to my blog post that has instructions and a template so you can make your own Truffle Boxes.

Enjoy, Candy

Art On The Go! – Tea Bag Folding

Another trip this past week in Josie, our new-to-us camper, gave me a little more experience in organizing and making art while traveling. With limited space, I had to pick my project carefully and decide what to take on this trip. For this trip it was cutting and folding tea bag wrappers.

This tea bag rosette was made from 8 tea bag wrappers like the one in the photo above.

This tea bag rosette was made from 8 tea bag wrappers like the one in the photo above.

My friends have been graciously saving and giving me their tea bag wrappers for a number of months and I have amassed a rather large number of them. I decided to take a stack of the tea bag wrappers with me and cut them into 2″ squares as well as start folding them into rosettes. I wanted to try a new fold I had found and see how it looked when folded.

I have great friends who have saved their tea bag wrappers for me. I now have a great treasure trove of many varieties of tea, many I never new of before.

I have great friends who have saved their tea bag wrappers for me. I now have a great treasure trove of many varieties of tea, many of which I never new about.

This trip was easy to pack for because I didn’t need to do any prep work other than gathering the supplies and putting them in the van. I just packed a small cutter, some tea bag wrappers, the new instructions I had just found and a little glue. It all fit in one small bag.

This is the portable cutter I took with me. It was easy to cut 2" squares from tea bag wrappers.

This is the portable cutter I took with me. It was easy to cut 2″ squares from tea bag wrappers.

I enjoyed playing with the tea bags and the new fold. What I found was that cutting and both folding use similar muscle groups. For future trips, I’d like to include more variety in what I take with me to work on while traveling.

This photo shows the original tea bag wrapper and how it looks cut into a 2" square along with a sample of the completed rosette that is made of 8 of the 2" squares.

This photo shows the original tea bag wrapper and how it looks cut into a 2″ square along with the completed rosette  made of 8 of the 2″ squares.

It’s going to take lots more trips to get through all my tea bag wrappers. I have some ideas I want to try out along with different folds and color combinations.

I didn't know there were this many different Stash teas. I love all the different colors of the wrappers. I can see a rainbow in my future.

I didn’t know there were this many different Stash teas. I love all the different colors of the wrappers. I see a rainbow in the future.

For more information about tea bag folding (including links to instructions) see my blog post: DIY – Tea Bag Folding & Paper Origami Rosettes

Enjoy, Candy

Art On The Go! – Origami Mandalas

This past week I received an order for a number of Origami Mandalas. I also have sold a number of them from my studio. So, on my 4 day camping trip this week, I decided to try making Origami Mandalas in our new-to-us little RV while traveling and camping. (See Josie’s Story – Introducing Art On The Go! for details on our new-to-us little RV.)

I was able to fold a lot papers for Origami Mandalas on my latest camping trip.

I was able to fold a lot papers for Origami Mandalas on my latest camping trip. The key was having the papers cut and ready to be folded. Not much space is needed to fold.

My origami mandalas are made from paper scraps that are 1″ by 4″. Even after using paper scraps for the paper wrapped pencils I made last week, I still had enough smaller scraps left to make quite a few origami mandalas.

Here I'm working on deciding color combinations for the Origami Mandalas.

Here I’m working on deciding color combinations for the Origami Mandalas.

I cut the papers for the origami mandalas and took them with me on our 4 day camping trip. I folded every day. What I discovered was that I need to have varied tasks and not just fold all the time. My muscles got tired easily when I was only doing folding. When I started doing other things, like sketching or gluing, I could work longer than when I was just folding. I think this is because at home I’m getting interrupted a lot more and move around more than when I’m traveling in a tiny space.

For some reason I am drawn to the color green for healing, as in this Origami Mandala.

For some reason I am drawn to the color green for healing, as in this Origami Mandala.

For my next trip, I will take more of a variety of projects with me. I will include some folding, but I’ll also have other projects that use other muscles. Our van is quite small and I don’t move around in it as much as I do at home, so I’m going to have to consider that when picking what to take with me.

I'm drawn to the color blue for dreaming, as in this Origami Mandala.

I’m drawn to the color blue for dreaming, as in this Origami Mandala.

Storage is at a premium, so planning ahead is essential. While I plan on taking multiple projects, what I do take has to take up as little space as possible.

Another green for healing in this Origami Mandala.

Another green for healing in this Origami Mandala.

One of my projects for this next week is to make a list of the things I do on a regular basis that might be appropriate to take with me when traveling. I’m going to include everything from parts of projects to entire projects. I’m thinking that most will require prep work before I go, much like the cutting of the 1″ by 4″ strips for folding my Origami Mandalas did for this trip.

Blue again for this dream Origami Mandala.

Blue again for this dream Origami Mandala.

For links to instructions to make Origami Mandalas and other rosette and mandala folds see my blog post: DIY – Tea Bag Folding & Paper Origami Rosettes.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Square Paper Envelopes From Magazines & Catalogs

There is a monthly First Friday Art Walk in Ashland, Oregon where I have my studio at the Ashland Art Center. During the Art Walk I usually demonstrate a paper project to those who visit my studio. Last Friday I demonstrated how to make square envelopes from paper circles. I originally made my square circles from gift bags. (See the link to my blog post with instructions at the end of this article.) This time I tried a magazine, a woman’s clothing catalog and an old gallery guide.

Square Paper envelopes made from a catalog, magazine and an old gallery guide.

Square Paper envelopes made from a catalog, magazine and an old gallery guide.

The paper was lighter weight than the gift bags, but the envelopes came out wonderfully. What I like the best about these envelopes is how colorful they are. And those of you who follow my blog know how much I like color!

Two envelopes made from this National Geographic magazine.

Two envelopes made from this National Geographic magazine.

I love the photos in the National Geographic magazine, but their magazine pages are too small to make most envelopes. Not so when you only need circles. With their abundance of double page spreads, I was able to get quite a number of gorgeous envelopes. I was able to get two circles per page using a CD as my template.

This photo shows a number of double spreads from the National Geographic magazine that became envelopes like the square envelope on the lower left that was made from a woman's clothing catalog.

This photo shows a number of double spreads from the National Geographic magazine that became envelopes like the square envelope on the lower left that was made from a woman’s clothing catalog.

I also had an old gallery guide that I cut many circles from. Then I arranged them by color or mood and made a number of  envelopes.

My favorite envelope, frozen fowers.

My favorite envelope, frozen flowers.

Here is the link to the instructions to make these envelopes: DIY – Square Envelopes Made From Paper Circles

HINT:
With the lighter weight paper I found glue stick to be my preferred glue. The liquid glue made the paper wrinkle a bit.

Enjoy, Candy

Nuptial Spirit Vessel – The Process

Last summer I received a commission to make one of my spirit vessels for a wedding. I posted a photo of the paste papers that were chosen for the vessel and asked for ideas as to what to call this type of vessel. After many suggestions on my blog and from friends, I finally settled on calling it a Nuptial Spirit Vessel.

Nuptial Spirit Vessel, Safe Harbor.

Nuptial Spirit Vessel, Safe Harbor.

Now that it has been delivered to the bride and groom, I can share the photos of its making. It started with blue, teal and silver paste papers.

Paste papers cut and folding started for the Nuptial Spirit Vessel, Safe Harbor.

Paste papers cut and folding started for the Nuptial Spirit Vessel, Safe Harbor.

I chose to write the messages for this vessel in copperplate, rather than the italic that I use for the Earth Spirit Vessels. Because copperplate is traditionally used for weddings, it seemed fitting for a Nuptial Spirit Vessel.

Here are some of the 25 messages I calligraphed for inclusion into the vessel.

Here are some of the 25 messages I calligraphed for inclusion into the vessel.

The messages were chosen specifically for the two newlyweds by the person who commissioned the vessel.

The start of Nuptial Spirit Vessel, Safe Harbor.

The start of Nuptial Spirit Vessel, Safe Harbor.

I start making my vessels at the bottom and work up. The above photo shows the vessel with four rows completed.

A closer look at the first few rows of this Nuptial Spirit Vessel.

A closer look at the first few rows of this Nuptial Spirit Vessel.

I continue adding pieces, one row at a time. I add one row, fiddle with making sure everything is round and just the way I want, then glue each individual piece of paper.

Here I've added another couple of rows to the Nuptial Spirit Vessel.

Here I’ve added a few more rows to Nuptial Spirit Vessel, Safe Harbor. This is looking inside.

The above photo is looking into the center of the vessel from above. Its shape isn’t visible from this photo.

This is the look of the outside of the Nuptial Vessel. It's looking at it upside down.

This is the look of the outside of the Nuptial Vessel. It’s looking at it upside down.

The above two photos are from the same stage of completion. The second photo shows the outside of the vessel, though it’s upside down in the photo so you can see what the outside looks like at this point in its construction.

Now the Nuptial Vessel is a little further along. Looking down at the inside.

Now the Nuptial Vessel is a little further along. Looking down at the inside.

The more rows I add, the more the shape becomes apparent. The size of the hole in the bottom of the vessel actually changes shape as the vessel gets larger.

You can finally see how the outside of the Nuptial Vessel is taking shape.

You can finally see how the outside of the Nuptial Vessel is taking shape.

The above two photos show the vessel at the same stage of completion. You can see how the shape is starting to show.

Now it's time to choose the burl wood for the base of the Nuptial Vessel.

Now it’s time to choose the burl wood for the base of the Nuptial Vessel.

All my spirit vessels have burl wood bases. The photo above shows the different pieces of burl wood I looked at before deciding on the one I liked best for this vessel.

Nuptial Spirit Vessel, Safe Harbor.

Finished Nuptial Spirit Vessel, Safe Harbor.

I have been told that the bride and groom absolutely loved their Nuptial Spirit Vessel and were actually moved to tears. It gives me great joy to know that my art has touched the heart of others.

Enjoy, Candy