Tag Archives: paste paper

DIY Holiday Origami Envelopes

Today I thought I would share some Christmas envelopes I made for my friend Margie. She had seen the ones I made earlier this year and wanted some made from Christmas wrapping paper.

The papers for these origami envelopes are from a holiday gift paper sample book.

The papers for these origami envelopes are from a holiday gift paper sample book.

Back in April, during National Letter Writing Month, I made a number of these envelopes using scanned images of my paste papers. I then found I could make them the perfect size for gift cards (the perfect gift for new grads).

Close up of some holiday origami envelopes made from gift wrap sample paper.

Close up of some holiday origami envelopes made from gift wrap sample paper.

Now, using wrapping paper from sample books that were given to me, I made a bunch of holiday origami envelopes.

HINT: It is best to work with quality wrapping paper, not the cheap variety. I found this out the hard way. I started with some cheap wrapping paper a friend gave me, but I didn’t like the way it folded. Luckily my friends at Nimbus, a local Ashland gallery, gifted me some samples of wrapping paper at just the right time. So, get a heavier weight quality wrapping paper to get the best results.

Close up of some holiday origami envelopes made from gift wrap sample paper.

Close up of some holiday origami envelopes made from gift wrap sample paper.

You can find links to the instructions to make these envelopes on my blog post: DIY Origami Envelope.
And to check out how to make them the size for gift cards, you can see my blog post: DIY Gift Card Origami Envelope.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Starting Another Earth Spirit Vessel

This past week I started another Earth Spirit Vessel. There’s actually a lot of work that needs to be done before I start building the vessel itself. For this vessel, I chose a pure white paper and combined it with painted paste papers of various shades of green with gold highlights.

This is the beginning of another Earth Spirit Vessel.

This is the beginning of another Earth Spirit Vessel.

I started out with  papers that were 19.5″ by 25″ and then cut them into 2″ by 4″ pieces of paper. On 25 of the pieces of paper I wrote inspirations and quotes related to Nature and Mother Earth.  I then hand folded each of the papers nine times. You can see the triangular folded pieces in the above photo.

This is one of the 25 quotes that I calligraphed for this Earth Spirit Vessel.

This is one of the 25 quotes that I calligraphed for this Earth Spirit Vessel.

After all the preparation, I got to start putting the Earth Spirit Vessel together. I built it one row at a time.

I don't yet have a name for this Earth Spirit Vessel. I think the name will come to me as I continue to build it and decide what I'm going to do with the green as far as a design.

I don’t yet have a name for this Earth Spirit Vessel. I think the name will come to me as I continue to build it and decide what I’m going to do with the green as far as a design.

After I got each row in position, I took off one folded piece at a time and glued it to the piece below. The gluing is not actually necessary, but it means that the shape of the vessel stays intact. Note: I only raised boys, so I know how easily they could dismantle something like this. And although I offer to make my Earth Spirit Vessels without glue, no one has ever taken me up on the offer. I think that’s very smart of them.

View from above of my latest Earth Spirit Vessel in progress.

View from above of my latest Earth Spirit Vessel in progress.

Yes, it does take a lot of work to make each vessel. It’s a wonderfully meditative process and I truly enjoy making each and every one.

Enjoy, Candy

Learning Experiences (a.k.a. mistakes)

My personal motto is: “If you can’t learn from your mistakes, there’s no sense making them.” Well this past week was apparently set aside for learning from my mistakes as I had a few problems with my custom order for 16 accordion card books.

Cracking when folding. From now on, I will be very careful of mixing acrylic inks in my watercolors when I know I'll be folding the paper.

Cracking when folding. From now on, I will be very careful of mixing acrylic inks in my watercolors when I know I’ll be folding the paper.

I thought I had everything under control. I wrote out a schedule to make sure I was going to get the order completed in a week. Everything was going fine until Saturday when I folded the 12 Thank You’s just prior to attaching their covers. That’s when the color cracked on most of the folds.

Another example of cracking on the fold.

Another example of cracking on the fold.

What happened? I was recreating a color combination that I had done about a year ago. The colors looked fine, so I didn’t run a check of one completed book. I just did them all together. Apparently I mixed too much FW Pearlescent Liquid Acrylic into my watercolors. Oops!

Another learning experience – don't rush! Here I rushed and got just a drop of glue on my paper. I didn't notice it and put it under weights. The paper tore when I opened the book. Another oops!

Another learning experience – don’t rush! Here I rushed and got just a drop of glue on my paper. I didn’t notice it and put it under weights. The paper tore when I opened the book.

And to add insult to injury, as I rushing to replace the card books that had cracked, I made another mistake. This time I wasn’t careful with my glue because I was trying to get as many accordion card books finished as possible so I could get them to the Post Office before closing time. Note to self: You will probably get more done if you don’t rush. Just breathe and do what you can.

One of the card books open, the rest closed. The two in front are finished and have their gold ties with beads.

One of the card books open, the rest closed. The two in front are finished and have their gold ties with beads.

The good news is that I have a wonderful client who didn’t mind that I only sent out part of her order today. I’ll send the rest out later this week.

These are the accordion card books that went out today. I have placed a protective paper in them so any moisture from the glue won't warp the opposite page.

These are the accordion card books that went out today. I have placed a paper as a barrier for any moisture left over from recent gluing.

Lessons learned. Run a check before making multiples of anything. Don’t rush. And maybe, add a little more time on projects for the unexpected. Hopefully this will help you from making these same mistakes.

Happy creating, Candy

Studio Snapshot – New Earth Spirit Vessel: Autumn Blaze

This past week I have been finishing up my latest Earth Spirit Vessel, Autumn Blaze. I actually started this last fall, but was so busy this past winter and spring, that I never got it finished. So after coming back from a wonderful calligraphy and art retreat, I decided to finish some past projects before I delved into starting new pieces of paper art.

Earth Spirit Vessel, Autumn Blaze made from folded paper.

Earth Spirit Vessel, Autumn Blaze made from folded paper.

Some of the papers in Autumn Blaze are hand painted paste papers. I included gold powder in the paste paper. It gives the vessel a subtle glow that isn’t quite apparent in the photo.

The beginning of making Earth Spirit Vessel, Autumn Blaze.

The beginning of making Earth Spirit Vessel, Autumn Blaze.

Autumn Blaze contains 592 pieces of hand folded pieces of 2″ by 4″ paper. Each piece of paper is folded 9 times and glued in place. While it is not necessary to glue the pieces, I have never had anyone want a vessel that was not glued. I only raised boys, and I know how inquisitive minds like to take things apart to see how they were made. I think my customers must think like me.

Earth Spirit Vessel, Autumn Blaze as it is beginning to take shape.

Earth Spirit Vessel, Autumn Blaze as it is starting to take shape.

If you want to know more about my Earth Spirit Vessels, you can check out these blog posts of mine:
Earth Spirit Vessels
Earth Spirit Vessels – The Process
Earth Spirit Vessels From My Paste Paper Show

Enjoy, Candy

DIY – Puffy Pentagon Box

It’s that time again . . . chocolate is in the air as Ashland prepares for the Oregon Chocolate Festival which starts on Friday. Last year I designed the Clover Fold Box to fit a single Dagoba Chocolate Taster Square. This year I designed the Puffy Pentagon Box which will also nicely hold a Taster Square.

These Puffy Pentagon Boxes are perfect to hold a Chocolate Dagoba Taster Square.

These Puffy Pentagon Boxes are the perfect size to hold a Chocolate Dagoba Taster Square.

I have included a template at the end of this blog post that you can download to make your own Puffy Pentagon Boxes. Print the template on the back of a decorated paper, then cut and fold. I suggest using card stock for best results.

Five Puffy Pentagon Boxes made from my paste papers.

Five Puffy Pentagon Boxes made from my paste papers.

There’s no glue or tape or ribbon needed to hold this box together. It’s a little tricky to close the box at first, but once you have done once or twice, it becomes easy.

Dagoba Chocolate Taster Squares fit nicely into these Puffy Pentagon boxes. They make perfect hostess gifts.

Dagoba Chocolate Taster Squares fit nicely into these Puffy Pentagon boxes. They make perfect hostess gifts.

These little boxes with a little chocolate inside make perfect hostess gifts.

Puffy Pentagon Box

Puffy Pentagon Box made from one of my paste papers.

Since these boxes store flat, you can make a bunch at a time and store them. They’ll be ready to puff into action whenever there is a need. Of course, you need to make sure you haven’t eaten all the chocolate or whatever you have to go in them.

Puffy Pentagon Box made from one of my paste papers.

Puffy Pentagon Box made from one of my paste papers.

Puffy Pentagon Box made from one of my paste papers.

Puffy Pentagon Box made from one of my paste papers.

Puffy Pentagon Box made from one of my paste papers.

Puffy Pentagon Box made from one of my paste papers.

Puffy Pentagon Box made from one of my paste papers.

Puffy Pentagon Box made from one of my paste papers.

Fold the flaps in like shown above. After the first couple of times, it becomes easy.

Fold the flaps in like shown above. After the first couple of times, it becomes fairly easy.

For more information about Dagoba Chocolate (which has its facilities in Ashland, Oregon): DagobaChocolate.com

For more information about paste papers: Making Paste Papers: Part One

Template: Puffy Pentagon Box

Enjoy, Candy

DIY Halloween Treat Boxes

Every year I give out Halloween treats in boxes that I’ve made. This year I’m using my Truffle Box template to make my Halloween treat boxes.

This box is made from a file folder and covered with fabric. I cut and folded the file folder, then glued the fabric on the file folder.

This box is made from a file folder and covered with fabric. I cut and folded the file folder, then glued the fabric on the file folder.

In addition to making my own Halloween treat boxes, I taught my fellow calligraphers how to make them too. I asked them to bring paper suitable for Halloween boxes and taught them how to make these boxes without the need for a template.

This box was made in my box class. The paper ribbon makes this simple orange box into something very special.

This box was made in my box class. The paper ribbon makes this simple orange box into something very special.

The instructions for making these boxes without a template is a bit too much to explain in this blog, so for those of you reading this blog, you can just download the Truffle Box template and print it on the back of your paper and fold as shown in my blog post DIY Truffle Box.

Another Halloween box made in my class. This was made with scrapbook paper.

Another Halloween box made in my class. This was made with scrapbook paper.

There are many adaptations you can make for the closure of this box. You can see some of the ideas my fellow calligraphers came up with. Think of beads and loops and sticks and wire ribbon and more.

Fall leaves scrapbook paper was used to make this box. This is another box from the class I taught.

Fall leaves scrapbook paper was used to make this box. This is another box from the class I taught.

If you look closely, you can see that this box is made from paper that is black on black. Another box from my class.

If you look closely, you can see that this box is made from paper that is black on black. Another box from the class I taught.

This box, made in the class I taught, uses raffia to hold it closed.

This box, made in the class I taught, uses raffia to hold it closed.

I decided to tie all my Halloween Treat Boxes with raffia. It's easy to open and has a Halloween feel to it.

I decided to tie all my Halloween Treat Boxes with raffia. It’s easy to open and has a Halloween feel to it.

Luckily I don’t get too many trick-or-treaters at my house. All I need is a few dozen boxes which I fill with non-edible treats. I don’t like the idea of giving candy to children, so I give bat and skull rings and other little treats in my boxes.

This Halloween Treat Box is made out of a digital scanned image of one of my paste papers.

This Halloween Treat Box is made out of a digital scanned image of one of my paste papers.

I still have a few boxes from previous years, so I can be pretty confident that I won’t run out of boxes for my treats. So far, I haven’t had that problem.

Another of my scanned digital paste papers made into a Halloween Treat Box.

Another of my scanned digital paste papers made into a Halloween Treat Box.

Another Halloween Treat Box made from one of my scanned digital paste papers.

Another Halloween Treat Box made from one of my scanned digital paste papers.

I love how these Halloween Treat Boxes look together.

I love how these Halloween Treat Boxes look together.

Here’s the information on making these yourself.

Truffle Box template (click to download)

DIY Truffle Box (blog post with instructions for folding)

Enjoy, Candy

Paste Paper Envelopes & Gold Brush Pen

I really enjoy Jean Wilson’s blog, Pushing The Envelopes. Jean is a fellow calligrapher who is an avid mail art enthusiast. She regularly hosts mail art envelope exchanges. This is what I send out for September’s exchange.

Envelopes made from paste papers in autumn colors. Gold brush pen on bottom right.

Envelopes made from paste papers in autumn colors. Gold brush pen (bottom right) was used to write the names on envelopes.

I made my envelopes out of autumn colors of paste papers I made in August. After cutting and folding my envelopes, I used my new Kuretake Gold Metallic Brush Pen. I purchased it from Paper and Ink Arts last spring, but had never gotten around to trying it. Now that I have, I’ll be using is a lot more. I love it!

Paste paper envelopes with names and stamps. One of the envelopes goes to France and one to Australia.

Paste paper envelopes with names and stamps. One of the envelopes goes to France and one to Australia.

I really am going to have to play with different colors of backgrounds for my gold brush. It’s obvious that it shows up better on some backgrounds than others. I love trying new tools and this one is obviously a keeper.
Enjoy, Candy

Paste Paper Recipes

Last month (and now continuing into this month) I’ve been making paste papers, lots and lots of paste papers. Those of you who follow my blog know what I’m talking about, but for others, here’s a link to find out more about what paste papers are: Making Paste Papers – Part One.

Some of my paste papers.

Some of my paste papers.

This year I decided to try out a number of different paste paper recipes. It was interesting to see how different recipes changed how the paste worked. While my favorite recipe is still my archival cooked paste, I have found others that work almost as well. I’m sharing the results here.

Some of the triangle boxes stacked.

Some of the triangle boxes. There’s a lot you can make with paste papers.

Wall Paper Paste Recipe
The easiest “recipe” is to purchase premixed wall paper paste from Home Depot. Add color to the paste, then paint and decorate the wet or damp paper. I used Golden Liquid Acrylics, but anything that would color the paste would work.

What I liked. The paste is premixed and doesn’t need straining. The paste doesn’t need to be refrigerated and keeps almost forever. There’s very little prep work needed. The finished paste paper is not likely to crack. The finished paper will not attract bugs.

What I didn’t like. Because a lot of the work is already done for you, it does cost more money than most other pastes. I had no control over the consistency as it was premixed. I found the paste to be just a little thinner than I like. When the paste dried it was a bit dull.

Flour & Water Recipe
Flour and water is another possible paste that can be easily made. If you add non-toxic tempera paints, this is a very inexpensive paste that can be used with young children.

3 cups water
1/2 cup flour
Add just enough of the water to the flour to make a paste the consistency of cream. Boil the rest of the water, then add the flour and water mixture. Simmer for 10 minutes, stirring constantly. Remove from the heat. Strain through a strainer or cheesecloth to remove any lumps. Let the paste cool before using.

What I liked. The ingredients are easy to find. It’s easy to make and it’s non-toxic.

What I didn’t like. Bugs tend to like the dried flour. It’s not archival. Cooking takes time. If I’m going to this much trouble to cook paste, I would want to make my archival recipe. The paste needs to be used in a few days or it goes bad.

Cornstarch Recipe
Another recipe that uses ingredients you’re likely to already have on hand. Although it’s not my favorite, many paste paper artists like this recipe.

1/4 cup cornstarch
1 3/4 cups water
Mix cornstarch with 1/4 cup cold water. Add 1 cup water and heat on medium high. Stir constantly until mixture resembles a thick custard. Remove from heat and add the remaining 1/2 cup water. Mix once, then let sit to cool thoroughly. After cool, strain paste through strainer or cheesecloth.

What I liked. This only calls for cornstarch and water, something I always have in my kitchen.

What I didn’t like. I find the paste papers made with this to be a bit dull. The paste needs to be used in a few days or it goes bad.

Methyl Cellulose Recipe
This is the hardest recipe to explain as the quantities of water to powder change depending on where you get your methyl cellulose. While Daniel Smith no longer sells it, I used about half as much of their methyl cellulose to get the same consistency as I got using the methyl cellulose I got from John Neal Bookseller. However, John Neal’s methyl cellulose mixed much easier than Daniel Smith’s. So, my best suggestion is to mix it as suggested by whoever you get your methyl cellulose from.

What I liked. Once mixed, it lasts indefinitely (use distilled water and glass or plastic containers, no metal). It’s almost like working with watercolors. Great top coat when adding another color on a different type of paste paper. Archival.

What I didn’t like. It takes a while to find the right water/methyl cellulose balance. It’s almost like working with watercolors and gives a soft edge. Some paste paper artists use about 50% methyl cellulose and 50% acrylic. It is very expensive, in my opinion to use this much acrylic paint. I use about 1 teaspoon of acrylic to 1/2 cup of paint (though I never actually measure).

Non-Cook Wheat Starch Paste Recipe
This powder is somehow precooked. It is mixed with cold water and requires no cooking. You can order it from John Neal Bookseller and probably other places.

4 tablespoons non-cook wheat starch
2 cups cold water
Add 4 tablespoons non-cook wheat starch paste to 2 cups cold water. Stir until mixed. Strain paste through strainer or cheesecloth.

What I liked. It’s easy to make. No cooling time required. It’s easy to control the thickness.

What I didn’t like. I can only get the non-cook wheat starch online. The paste needs to be used in a few days or it goes bad.

My Archival Wheat Starch & Rice Flour Recipe
This is my favorite recipe. I’ve been using it for years and I know just what to expect from it.

4 tablespoons wheat starch
3 tablespoons rice flour
3 cups boiling distilled water
1 teaspoon tincture of green soap
1/2 teaspoon glycerine
optional – several drops of oil of cloves as a preservative
Mix wheat starch and rice flour with just enough cool distilled water to for a mixture the consistency of heavy cream. Let sit for 30 minutes. Add 1 cup boiling water to starch and flour mixture. Place in double boiler (already hot), stir and add another cup boiling water almost immediately. Stir constantly. Cook for about 5 minutes. Add another cup boiling water and cook about another 5 minutes, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Add glycerine and soap. Mix well, but don’t beat (you don’t want to introduce air bubbles). After cool, strain paste through strainer or cheesecloth.

What I liked. I like the texture of this paste on the paper. It’s archival. The colors are brighter than with some other pastes. The paste holds patterns well.

What I didn’t like. Sometimes I’d rather have a smoother surface, but that’s what other recipes are for. Ingredients are hard to find. I have to order the wheat starch online. I get the glycerine from my local pharmacy. I order the tincture of green soap from my local pharmacy. The paste needs to be used in a few days or it goes bad.

I love the various colors of purple and gold that will eventually find their way into an Earth Spirit Vessel.

Purple and gold paste papers that will eventually find their way into an Earth Spirit Vessel.

My Suggestions
If cost is your #1 concern, go with the Flour and Water Recipe or the Cornstarch Recipe.

If you want super easy, use Home Depot’s wall paper paste.

If you want the most archival, go with either the Methyl Cellulose Recipe or My Archival Wheat Starch & Rice Flour Recipe.

My suggestion for the best combination of ease and quality, I would suggest the Non-Cook Wheat Starch Recipe. To make it a bit more archival and flexible, add 1/4 teaspoon of glycerine and 1/2 teaspoon of liquid dish soap (or tincture of green soap if you can get it).

Some of my paste papers.

More of my paste papers.

For adding color to your paste, I use Golden Liquid Acrylics. I use about 1 teaspoon of acrylic to about 1/2 cup paste. I don’t measure, so it’s just approximate. I like Golden because their acrylics are heavily pigmented. You may need more of other acrylics or other paints (like tempera) to get the same color saturation. Experiment. You can use anything that will color paints.

If you are using this with children and you want to make sure everything is non-toxic, I would suggest trying Natural Earth Paints. They are made by Leah, a friend of mine. Check out her Children’s Earth Paint Kit.

Enjoy, Candy

 

Studio Snapshot – Earth Spirit Vessel In Progress

This week the weather has suddenly changed to cool fall temperatures. It feels too cold to make paste papers, so this past week I’ve started a new Earth Spirit Vessel with an autum feel to it. The variegated brown and orange tones of some of my paste papers fit with the way the weather makes me feel.

This is the start of a new Earth Spirit Vessel.

This is the start of a new Earth Spirit Vessel.

The shape of the center changes as the vessel grows. In an attempt to keep the center round I sometimes use a glass or vase to place it on between adding rows.

The started Earth Spirit Vessel is on a plastic glass to help keep the center shape round.

This started Earth Spirit Vessel is on a plastic glass to help keep the center shape round.

As I slowly build my vessel, I try on different names for it until I find one that seems to fit the vessel. I think this vessel will have something to do with Autumn or the changing of seasons.

Enjoy, Candy

Paste Paper Tools

I thought you might enjoy seeing some of the tools I use to make my paste papers. I included a photo of a paste paper along with the tool I used to make the design.

This tool is a favorite of many. I found it years ago in the paint section of a local paint store.

This tool is a favorite of many. I found it years ago in the paint section of a local paint store.

If you are new to paste papers, you can find out more information about them on these links to some of my previous blog posts.
Making Paste Papers – Part One
Making Paste Papers – Part Two

Yes, this is a toilet paper roll. It makes nice marks, especially as it gets used more and more.

Yes, this is a toilet paper roll. It makes nice marks, especially as it gets used more and more.

As you can see, you can make some very nice paste papers using things that are sitting around your house right now. You may, however, want to finish using your toilet paper before using the core as a paste paper tool.

You can find this rubber tool in many art supply shops.

You can find this rubber tool in many art supply shops.

Adding a second or third color using an old paintbrush can make an interesting paste paper.

Adding a second or third color using an old paintbrush can make an interesting paste paper. This is an inexpensive brush. I think I paid $1 for it.

This tool is cut from a piece of packaging insulation. Just about anything that will make a mark can be used.

This tool is cut from a piece of packaging insulation. Just about anything that will make a mark can be used.

This is a foam stamp. I found this in the children's toy section of a variety store.

This is a foam stamp. I found this in the children’s toy section of a variety store.

This is another stamp that was in the same package as the stamp in the photo above.

This is another stamp that was in the same package as the stamp in the previous photo.

This tool can be used 3 ways. I found it years ago in a paint store along with the tool in the first photo in this blog post.

This tool can be used 3 ways. I found it years ago in a paint store along with the tool in the first photo in this blog post.

I believe I got this tool from the University of Oregon Bookstore a year or two ago.

I believe I got this tool from the University of Oregon Bookstore a year or two ago.

I've had this for years. I think it is a comb for women's hair.

I’ve had this for years. I think it is a comb for women’s hair.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Start Of A Newly Commissioned Vessel

I just received a commission for a new type of vessel. Up until now I’ve been making Earth Spirit Vessels. Now a friend wants me to make a vessel to celebrate the marriage of a couple of her friends. I love the idea, but what should I call this new type of vessel?

Combining the colors blue, teal and silver for paste papers for a newly commissioned vessel.

Combining the colors blue, teal and silver for paste papers for a newly commissioned vessel.

Is it a Matrimonial Spirit Vessel or a Commitment Spirit Vessel or is there a better name for this new type of vessel? The colors chosen are blue, teal and silver. The next decision is what color or colors to combine with the paste paper. I’m thinking of a white or off white.

This is what I've been working on this past week, making, cutting & folding paste paper for a new vessel.

This is what I’ve been working on this past week, making, cutting & folding paste paper for a new vessel.

So, I’m looking for a name for this type of Spirit Vessel. It will still have calligraphy quotes and words inside some of the folded pieces. I will be receiving them tomorrow. Please weigh in on whether you think it should be called a Matrimonial Spirit Vessel or a Commitment Spirit Vessel or some other name.

Many thanks, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Paste Paper Boxes

My neighborhood is sponsoring a Holiday Arts, Crafts & Collectibles Sale the Saturday before Thanksgiving. The profits from this sale will be donated to our Community Art Fund for art for our community.

Three of the boxes I'm donating to our Holiday Arts, Crafts & Collectibles Sale.

Three of the boxes I’m donating to our Holiday Arts, Crafts & Collectibles Sale.

One of my contributions to this sale are these boxes that I have been making this past week. These were originally flat white boxes that were leftovers and donated by two different people. I took the flat white boxes and applied colored paste that I use to make my paste papers. You can see the wonderful results once they are folded into boxes.

Three more of the boxes I'm donating to our Holiday Arts, Crafts & Collectibles Sale.

Three more of the boxes I’m donating to our Holiday Arts, Crafts & Collectibles Sale.

You cannot purchase these boxes. You will only be able to get them if you spend a certain amount of money at our Holiday Sale.

This is how the boxes started out, flat. You can see the four colors of paste I'm using for this box.

This is how the boxes started out, flat. You can see the four colors of paste I’m using for this box.

I love being able to use boxes that were destined to be put in the recycle bin and make them into something to be treasured. Hopefully they will be used many times to exchange gifts.

The box on the lower left was the box from the photo above this one.

The box on the lower left is the same box from the photo above this one. It’s so much better looking once it’s colored.

I made a lot of these paste paper boxes this past week in my studio. Actually, for this month, my studio is my garage. I do tend get messy throwing colored paint around, so my garage is the perfect space for making paste papers.

I have added gold pigment to most of my paste paper boxes. I love how it jumps out on these purple boxes.

I have added gold pigment to most of my paste paper boxes. I love how it jumps out on these purple boxes

I will be sharing other items I’m making for the Holiday Arts, Crafts & Collectibles Sale in future blog posts.

Three more of the boxes I'm donating to our Holiday Arts, Crafts & Collectibles Sale.

Three more of the boxes I’m donating to our Holiday Arts, Crafts & Collectibles Sale.

Enjoy, Candy

 

Studio Snapshot – Back Making More Paste Papers

My burn is healing and I’m back making my paste papers. It looks as though I’ll be making my paste papers well into September.  I want to have enough paste papers to last me until next summer.

I have cut purple paste papers into 2" by 4" rectangles and am folding them into units that will eventually become one of my Earth Spirit Vessels.

I have cut purple paste papers into 2″ by 4″ rectangles and am folding them into units that will eventually become one of my Earth Spirit Vessels.

What’s new this year is that I need to make a lot more paste papers to incorporate into my Earth Spirit Vessels. The vessels I made last year were quite popular, so I will be making more this year.

I love the various colors of purple and gold that will eventually find their way into an Earth Spirit Vessel.

I love the various colors of purple and gold that will eventually find their way into an Earth Spirit Vessel.

This is what has been happening in my studio this past week. With my burn, I’ve been cutting and folding more than making paste papers. But, I’ve now healed enough to start making more paste papers again.

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshop – Children Making Paste Papers

As part of my First Friday Art Walk demonstration this past Friday, I invited children to make their own paste papers. First I demonstrated how I make my paste paper, then with the permission of a parent, I let the children make their very own paste paper.

Miles chose blue, green and yellow for his paste paper.

Miles chose blue, green and yellow for his paste paper.

I had an assistant on hand to dry the paste papers with a hair dryer so the children could take their paste paper home with them. Needless to say, it was a great success.

Miles using tools to make marks in his paste.

Miles using tools to make marks in his paste.

Moving my paste paper set from my garage to my studio at the Art Center takes a huge amount of time. I figure it takes me 3 days to prepare, set it up and then take it down afterwards.

Miles has used stamps and graining tools to make marks in his paste paper. He's almost finished in this photo.

Miles has used stamps and graining tools to make marks in his paste paper. He’s almost finished in this photo.

Watching the children make their very own paste papers was so worth the effort of setting up for this project. They were all so proud of their masterpieces. They kept coming back to check on how the drying was going on.

Mari chose pink, purple, blue and teal as her colors.

Mari chose pink, purple, blue and teal as her colors.

It’s not necessary to use the high quality materials I use if you are making paste paper with children. Your paste can be flour and water and your coloring can be tempera or food coloring. You can use just about anything to color your paste.

Here Mari is using a comb to add lines to her paste paper.

Here Mari is using a comb to add lines to her paste paper.

If you are looking for some high quality non-toxic children’s paints, check out my friend, Leah’s, Natural Earth Paints. Leah has created a line of paints that are non-toxic, from paints for children to paints for professional artists.

Mari's finished paste paper.

Mari’s finished paste paper.

This is not the first time I had children make paste papers in my studio at the Ashland Art Center. I did this a couple of years ago too. It was a huge hit then too.

Remy's colors were pink, purple and teal.

Remy chose pink, purple and teal for her paste paper.

Remy starting to make marks in her paste.

Remy making marks in her paste.

Remy's finished paste paper.

Remy’s finished paste paper.

Scarlett chose teal, blue, magenta and purple as her paste colors.

Scarlett chose teal, blue, magenta and purple as her paste colors.

 

Scarlett is about to make marks in her paste.

Scarlett is about to make marks in her paste.

Scarlett is stamping patterns in her colored paste.

Scarlett is stamping patterns in her colored paste.

Samara chose magenta, purple and blue as her paste colors.

Samara chose magenta, purple and blue as her paste colors.

Samara adding texture to her paste paper.

Samara adding texture to her paste paper.

Samara is just about done with her paste paper here.

Samara is just about done with her paste paper here.

Drake was a two fisted painter, chose yellow, teal and green as his paste colors.

Drake was a two fisted painter, chose yellow, teal and green as his paste colors.

Drake was my only 2-fisted painter. He was a delight to watch.

Drake was my only 2-fisted painter. He was a delight to watch.

In addition to using both hands, Drake really slathered his paste on the paper. It took a little longer to dry, but he sure got into the process.

In addition to using both hands, Drake really slathered his paste on the paper. It took a little longer to dry, but he sure got into the process.

 

Emelia chose purple, blue, magenta and pink for her paste colors.

Emelia chose purple, blue, magenta and pink for her paste colors.

Emelia painting  her paste paper.

Emelia painting her paste paper.

Emelia's finished paste paper.

Emelia’s finished paste paper.

Owen chose yellow, blue, teal and green as his colors.

Owen chose yellow, blue, teal and green as his colors.

Owen is making marks in his paste paper.

Owen is making marks in his paste paper.

Owen has almost finished his paste paper.

Owen has almost finished his paste paper.

The kids had a great time and I loved watching them. Here are some links if you are interested in additional information.

For non-toxic paints for children:
Natural Earth Paints

For more information on paste papers:
Making Paste Papers: Part One
Making Paste Papers: Part Two

To see the paste papers children made a few years ago:
Children Making Paste Papers

Enjoy, Candy

Studio Snapshot – Making Paste Papers For The Month Of August

This week I cleared out my garage and set it up to make paste papers. I do this each summer, usually in August, when it’s hot and my paste papers can dry quickly. I cooked my favorite archival paste recipe, added acrylic paints and started making my paste papers.

I turned my garage into my paste paper studio for the month of August.

I turned my garage into my paste paper studio for the month of August.

The above photo shows how I set up my garage in order to make paste papers. There is my work station in the center with an “in progress” paste paper. The wet of the paste shows more as a glare in the photo. I have my water bath set up behind my paste paper. My drying racks are in the back of the photo.

The paste papers I made day 1. They dry rather wrinkled and need to be ironed.

The paste papers I made day 1. They dry rather wrinkled and need to be ironed.

After the paste papers are dried, they need to be ironed. The pile in the above photo are from my first day of making paste papers. They will be ironed with a dry iron. I put them in a pillowcase or between two pieces of cloth when I iron them and put a wooden board beneath the cloth.

I will show further updates on my paste paper making throughout the month.

For more information on the making of paste papers, check out these two blog posts of mine:
Making Paste Papers – Part One
Making Paste Papers – Part Two

Enjoy, Candy